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Happy Thanksgiving! --Office Closed21-Nov-2018

Happy Thanksgiving from the team at Global Immersions Homestay! We hope you enjoy the day with y..

Welcome to Boston Homestay - Danish Ringkjobing Group!13-Oct-2018

Global Immersions Homestay welcomed a large group of visitors from Ringkjøbing in Denmark. T..


Best in Hospitality

Spend Thanksgiving in Plymouth

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Plymouth, Massachusetts, a coastal town south of Boston, is an ideal location for a festive Thanksgiving outing. If you’re familiar with the early history of America you may know that Plymouth, MA was the location of Plimoth Colony, the site of the first Thanksgiving between Pilgrims and the Native Americans that inhabited the land. Plymouth is an exciting location to learn about the history of Thanksgiving, listen to stories about life in Plimoth Colony, and experience the culture and traditions of the Wampanoag tribe. Here are some can’t miss attractions for your trip to Plymouth this Thanksgiving break:


Plymouth Plantation

Immerse yourself in 1620s Massachusetts, at a site strategically chosen and developed to mirror the Pilgrims original settlement. At Plimoth Plantation you’ll experience what life was like for the Pilgrims during their first years in Plimoth Colony. The Plantation is an authentic re-creation of the Pilgrims’ homes, including those of well-known colony leaders such as the Reverend Brewster, Miles Standish, and Governor Bradford. Costumed historians portray actual members of Plimoth Colony and share their stories with guests. Visitors can also make their way to the Wampanoag settlement, for a more holistic picture of Massachusetts’s famous history. Here, Native American interpreters teach guests about their ancestor’s traditions and culture. This area contains the region’s only three-fire wetu, a family house often referred to as a wigwam. Plimoth Plantation is open daily 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. 

 

Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock is another historical artifact on display in Plymouth. The rock sits close by to a full-scale replica of the Mayflower, which is typically parked on Plymouth’s waterfront but has currently been moved to get repairs done. Plymouth Rock is the site where the Pilgrims disembarked from the Mayflower and first stepped onto land in Plymouth. Some stories say that each Pilgrim stepped on Plymouth Rock as they left the Mayflower. Today, visitors to Pilgrim Memorial State Park can view Plymouth rock where interpreters teach its history from May until Thanksgiving.

Pilgrim Hall Museum

Pilgrim Hall Museum is the oldest continuously operating museum in the United States. At Pilgrim Hall museum visitors get a detailed look at the history of the Pilgrims and their settlement. The museum has artifacts gathered from Plimoth Colony, such as furniture, crafts, art, and other possessions. Like Plymouth Plantation, Plymouth Hall Museum also shows the history of the Wampanoag people, who lived in the area of Plimoth colony well before the Pilgrims arrived. Pilgrim Hall Museum is open daily from 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. 


Jabez Howland House & Sparrow House

The Jabez Howland and Sparrow houses are two homes dating back to the time of the Pilgrims settlement. The Jabez Howland is the only existing house in Plymouth actually inhabited by Pilgrims. Jabez Howland and his family were Pilgrims that lived in the home until they sold the home in 1680. The home was then a private residence until 1912 when it was converted into a museum. The Richard Sparrow House was built by its namesake, Richard Sparrow, in 1640. Sparrow was an English surveyor that came to Plymouth in 1636, more than a decade after the Pilgrims arrived on the Mayflower. The home is the oldest surviving house in Plymouth. Visitors can tour the home daily between 10:00 am and 5:00 pm.


Explore Downtown

Once you’ve had your fill of history and museum tours, exploring downtown Plymouth is always a fun activity. Plymouth’s quaint waterfront streets are lined with restaurants, candy stores, and souvenir shops. Try some classic New England fudge at Plimoth Candy Company or find a present to bring home at one of the many boutiques. 

Global Immersions wishes all of our hosts and visitors a happy Thanksgiving! Whether this is your first, second, or third Thanksgiving in Boston, be sure to share all your holiday celebrations with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Source: Planetware.com 

2018 World Series: Fun Facts

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Sunday night, the Boston Red Sox defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the 2018 World Series Champions! The two teams played an exciting 5 -games series, ending in a Red Sox victory. Did you watch the game with your host family? If so, did you know that you were one of the 30 million people that tuned in to see the Red Sox make history? Did you also know that before 2018, it had been 30 years since the LA Dodgers played in the World Series? or that a team hasn't won 108 games (like the Red Sox did this season) since 1986? WalletBase.com did some research and created this infographic to show these statistics and other facts about the World Series. If you're interested in learning some lesser-known info about Major League Baseball's annual championship, we put together some of the best fun facts:

The Players (and their salaries):

It’s no surprise that a career as  Major League Baseball player is a very lucrative profession. The highest paid player on the LA Dodgers, Klayton Kershaw makes $35.57 million a year and earns about $220,800 every inning he pitches. The highest paid player on the Red Sox, David Price, earns $30 million a year and about $170,500 every inning he pitches. The LA Dodgers team salary is $196.6 million, and the Red Sox team salary is $224.8 million. That’s a lot of $$$$! 

Viewership

Whether you’re a baseball fan or not, if you’re in Boston you probably watched at least one game of the World Series. Typically the last game of the World Series draws close to 30 million viewers (approximately 29.3 million for game 7 last year). The World Series as a whole was seen by 18.9 million people in 2017 and 13.7 million people this year. 


Ticket Sales

As you might have guessed, tickets to the World Series don’t come cheap. Any baseball super fan at Dodgers Stadium or Fenway Park during Game 1 of the World Series paid at least $321 for their seat according to WalletHub.  That number is cheap in comparison to last year ’s game 5, where $828 was the cheapest ticket price. It is estimated that the average ticket prices for the 2018 World Series games in Boston and Los Angeles were $1,290 and $1,965 respectively. This is similar to last year’s stats, where the average price of a ticket to the 2017 World Series was over $1,000. 

Ad Revenue

Tickets might be expensive, but the real money is in TV ad revenue. Corporations spend an average of $6355,000 for a 30-second commercial during the World Series (not bad compared to the 5 million+ dollars spent on a 30 second SuperBowl Ad). It is projected that ad revenue totals $58.1 million for each game beyond the minimum of four. Fox, TBS, and ESPN will have paid a total of $12.4 billion for the broadcast rights to the World Series from 2014 to 2021. In 2017 the total ad revenue generated by the World Series was $414 million, this year’s World Series most likely generated less, having only 5 games instead of 7. 


If you want to cheer on Boston's favorite sports team as they celebrate their World Series win, check out the Boston Red Sox Parade this Wednesday, October 31st! 

Red Sox World Series Victory Parade 

Date: October 31st 

Time: 11:00 am 

Place: Landsdown Street 

We want to see you in your Boston Red Sox gear! Share your World Series celebrations with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Halloween Fun in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 24, 2018

With October 31st right around the corner, it’s time to get into the Halloween spirit. If this is your first-time spending October in Boston, you have to take advantage of the fun, festive, and free Halloween happenings in the city. Celebrating Halloween is a great way to spend time with your host family while experiencing a part of U.S. culture that may be very different from your home country. Here is your guide to some of the exciting Halloween-themed activities happening this week!

See Some Costumed Canines

Attention animal lovers! There are two opportunities this Halloween to see a lot of dogs decked out in some hilarious, adorable, and creative costumes. Visit the Charles River Esplanade or Faneuil Hall Marketplace this Saturday to get in the Halloween spirit with some festive pups! The 8th Annual Canine Promenade is a half-mile parade along the Charles River for Bostonians and their pets. Admission is free for those who just want to spectate (and maybe pet some puppies). The Halloween Pet Parade at Faneuil Hall is another celebration for owners and their furry friends. During this parade registered participants have the chance to walk the red carpet for a panel of judges and compete for awards like Best of Show, Best Owner and Pet Combo, Most Creative, and Spookiest. Both events are from 12 pm – 2 pm, but if you’re feeling ambitious, why not attend both? After all, you can never have too many dogs in your life!  


Discover Spooky Halloween Decorations

One unique way to explore the city is to go on a hunt for the best Halloween decorations. Many homes in the Boston area go all out for Halloween, turning their house and lawn into an elaborate Halloween scene. The Jack-o’- lantern Journey at Franklin Park Zoo is one example of a Halloween wonderland, featuring a half-mile trail of 5,000 glowing, carved pumpkins. Beacon Hill is another part of the city that looks magical during Halloween. Residents illuminate their homes with festive lights paired with cotton cobwebs and other spooky decorations. The Boston Globe published an article about other addresses where home owners have gotten into the Halloween spirit. Maybe you’ll recognize some of the decorated homes near you! 


Pumpkin Palooza

The Lawn on D’s annual event is back again with more Halloween fun for all ages. Pumpkin Palooza features a lot of free events: like pumpkin carving, a costume parade, a magic show, fire dancers, and a juggling performance just to name a few. There will be live music performances by Angelo David, Aldous Collins, and Entrain at night, as well as a cash bar for those 21+. Kids and adults alike can ride around the lawn on a train, passing through the pumpkin tunnel or stopping to photograph their costumes in the photo booth. Pumpkin Palooza takes place this Saturday, October 27th with festivities beginning at noon until the evening.

Trick- or -Treating

The best way to experience Halloween in the U.S. is to go trick -or- treating! Ask your host family to take you trick- or- treating in your neighborhood. Trick-or-treating is a fun way to experience a U.S. tradition while exploring your homestay community and getting some candy! Most neighborhoods in the Boston area will have trick-or-treaters out on Halloween night, but you can always visit a different area if your town isn’t a great trick-or-treating spot. The South Boston Chamber of Commerce is hosting a Trick-or-Treating Event on East and West Broadway Street Halloween night from 4 pm- 6 pm, where local residences and businesses will be passing out candy. Remember to dress in your Halloween best! Ask your host family for help creating your costume.

Day of the Dead

The Mexican holiday, El Dia de Los Muertos, takes place at the same time as Halloween. Though the two holidays have some similarities. Day of the Dead is not the same as Halloween in Mexican culture. Day of the Dead is a celebration of deceased family members. On this day observers demonstrate love and respect to lost ancestors through rituals and celebrations filled with cultural symbolism.  Across Mexico, participants wear special makeup and costumes, have parades and parties, sing and dance, and make offerings to lost loved ones. Day of the dead is a three -day celebration from October 31st to November 2nd. The Mexican community in Boston hosts many events in honor of this holiday, such as the 3rd Annual Dia de Los Muertos Festival and Parade at the Veronica Rubles Cultural Center in East Boston. This event will feature a cultural parade as well as activities from 2 pm – 7 pm on Saturday, November 3. Admission to the festival is free. 

We hope you have a safe and happy Halloween! Share your creative costumes, favorite candy, and all your Halloween activities with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!


Source: Boston Magazine, Boston.com

Four Spots to See Fall Colors in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, October 08, 2018

If you’re living in the Boston area this fall, you may have noticed the leaves changing colors over the past two months. Fall foliage has come a bit later this season compared to recent years, due to above average moisture and temperatures this summer, however, the colors are expected to be just as beautiful. To make sure you don’t miss out on seeing peak fall foliage this summer SmokyMountains.com released its annual interactive fall foliage forecast map, to forecast when and where leaves will turn their best colors. 



What kinds of colors will I see?

According to experts, peak colors will arrive slightly later in 2018, due to “heavier precipitation and warmer temperature trends expected through September”. The weather in September will also impact the colors of foliage you see. September is a critical month as “crisp days combined with plenty of sunshine” throughout this month will produce the best colors. Aside from the weather, the colors you see are also dependent on the type of tree. Beech trees, hickories, tulip poplars, and birch trees have mainly yellow and orange leaves while sumacs, sweet gums, sourwoods, mountain ashes scarlet oaks, red maples, and some sugar maples have red leaves.

When will colors peak in Massachusetts?

In Massachusetts specifically, foliage is expected to reach its peak around October 15th (next Monday!) and some areas of the state where the leaves peaked in the previous week are forecast to be “beyond peak”. Only small areas of Southern states will remain unchanged by this date.

Where can I go to see the best fall colors?

You don’t have to travel too far to see some quality fall foliage. While perhaps the most trees are located outside the city, several areas in the Boston area have colorful trees that are worth seeing. Here are a few spots to check out:


Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge

Mount Auburn is one of the oldest landscaped cemeteries in the country and has a wide variety of different trees that are beautiful in fall. While you’re there you may like to take a guided foliage tour to explore all areas of the cemetery, such as the lookout tower, where you can have an amazing view of many Boston landmarks, such as the Zakim bridge and Harvard Stadium. Mount Auburn Cemetery is accessible by car or MBTA bus 71 and 3.


Arnold Arboretum, Boston

The Arnold Arboretum is located in the middle of Jamaica Plain and has 281 acres of different plants and foliage. Fun fact: The Arboretum was designed by Fredrick Law Olmsted, the same designer of New York City’s Central Park. With miles of bike trails and footpaths the Arboretum is also an ideal place for bike riding or running, especially on a warm fall day like the ones we have been experiencing.


Beacon Hill, Boston

Spending time in Boston’s smaller neighborhoods can be a good way to see some incredible fall colors. To explore Beacon Hill, start at Charles Street and make your way down the neighborhood's cobblestone streets, stopping in any little boutiques and shops along the way. You’ll be able to see autumn leaves as well as an area of the city you may have never visited before.


The Charles River Esplanade, Boston & Cambridge

The Esplanade has over three miles of walking paths along the Charles River, bordered by an array of fall trees. The Charles River is a relaxing place to go to enjoy autumn nature and see one of Boston’s famous waterfronts. To stroll the esplanade, start by the Museum of Science and walk in the direction of the Boston University Bridge where you can cross over to Cambridge. Alternatively, enter the Esplanade from the Boston-side of Massachusetts Avenue and take in the scenery from one of the nearby docks.


Source: Thrillist.com  

How to Spend Your Long Weekend

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, October 04, 2018
What is Columbus Day?? If you’re not familiar with this U.S. federal holiday you can read about its origins here. If you've spent the holiday in Boston before, you'll know that the most exciting part of Columbus Day is taking a mini-vacation away from school. If you’re a student in the Boston area you probably know that Columbus Day means you have an extra-long weekend, which also means you now have extra time to explore the city! Lucky for you there are a lot of fun events happening things weekend and many of them are free. Here are some ways to spend the upcoming long weekend in the city.



East Boston Columbus Day Parade
Head to East Boston Sunday afternoon to experience Columbus Day in the city. Watch and enjoy the annual Columbus Day Parade that has occurred in Boston since 1937. The parade will begin at 1:00 pm in the Suffolk Downs parking lot and will march down Bennington Street, ending at Maverick Square near the waterfront. The parade will feature local organizations as well as veterans groups and can best be viewed from the sidewalk along Bennington Street. 



Chicken Stock 

You might be familiar with the Boston area restaurant, the Chicken and Rice guys. Maybe you've seen their food truck on campus? Well, did you know that they are hosting a free event at the Medford Condon Shell this Saturday? The event will feature live funk, soul and R&B music from local artists as well as free Chicken and Rice Guy's food. The party's main event is their 5th annual ChickyRice eating contest and the Extra Hot Sauce Challenge, where the top contestants can win free Chicken and Rice Guys for a year. If you LOVE chicken and rice or have a high tolerance for spicy food you can sign up for the contest on their event page, however, it might just be fun to watch the other contestants compete.




HONK!

The HONK! festival returns this year to Somerville, for even more music, performances, and celebration. HONK! is a 3-day street band festival, where musicians from all over the U.S. (wielding a variety of brass and percussion instruments) play throughout the city's streets, with no sound speakers or stage to separate them from spectators. HONK! creates an immersive experience as the musicians play among the audience and invite them to join the fun. The festival kicks off Friday night with a lantern parade and band showcase in Davis Square neighborhoods. Then, on Saturday, over 25 bands take over Davis Square for a giant music and dance party, followed by a parade of musicians and local activist groups on Sunday. This event is a great opportunity to engage with members of the Boston community while enjoying live musical performances and the beautiful fall weather. 




Free Admission to the ICA

The Institute of Contemporary Art, normally closed on Mondays, will open on Columbus Day and offer free admission. This is a great opportunity to visit the ICA Watershed, the museum's seasonal space in East Boston, before it closes for the winter. On Monday visitors at the ICA can participate in special events and activities (like art making and short films) as well as view all of the museum's current exhibitions. This is a perfect time to visit the museum if you haven't been able to make your way there on a Thursday when museum admission is normally free.

 


The Manhattan Short Film Festival, an annual film festival of international short films, received thousands of entries from more than 70 countries this year. Of those entries, on 9 finalists were chosen. These 9 films were then screened over 1,000 times in theaters in more than 250 cities on six continents between September 27th and October 7th. On October 6th, those in the Boston area have the opportunity to see these films during a screening at the Museum of Fine Arts. Viewers are invited not only to watch the films but also to judge them! On entry to the theater, you are given a ballot card to vote for your favorite short film and actor. Your votes are sent to Manhattan Short's headquarters and the winner will be announced on Monday! You can watch the event trailer here. 



Spend your day off exploring Boston's Fenway neighborhood at the Opening Our Doors Event sponsored by the Fenway Alliance. Enjoy free activities like a neighborhood walking tour, live musical performances, art installations, an interactive community mural, craft making, and a rhythm and dance parade. The event begins at 10:00 am at 200 Huntington Avenue/Avenue of the Arts with a performance by Boston's Children's Chorus, a New Orleans-style front line parade, and free cupcakes from Oakleaf Cakes! Following the event kick-off, a complimentary trolley will bring attendees to activities at key locations such as Evans Way Park and the Museum of Fine Arts. 

We hope you take advantage of this holiday to explore Boston and are we are excited to see how you'll spend your day off.  Share your long weekend activities with by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Get Your Fill of Fine Arts This Weekend

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, September 24, 2018

Checking out Boston's music and art scene is a must-do during your immersion experience in the city. You might not know it, but Boston has a lot of free (or inexpensive) events celebrating the arts. This weekend, consider exploring Boston's fine art attractions outside of a traditional museum, and learn more about the city through art, film, and music! 

Music: The Boston Pops (Free Concert)

What better way to spend your Sunday than at a free concert put on by the world-famous Boston Pops! The Pops will perform a special free concert at Franklin Park as part of the Park's community arts festival. Aside from the concert, the festival will have other fun, interactive events, such as mural painting, an instrument playground, crafts, a photo booth, live animal demonstrations and more!

When: Sunday, September 30th, 3 pm - 7 pm (The Playstead at Franklin Park) 

Music: The Beyonce and Coldplay Experience 

Do you prefer pop to classical music? What about pop music mixed with science? If that sounds intriguing, consider spending your Saturday night at the Museum of Science to experience the popular music of your favorite artists, fused with stunning visuals under the Charles Hayden Planetarium dome. This is not your average listening party! Hear hits by Beyoncé or Coldplay as you are taken on a “sensory journey full of innovation, artistry, and imagination.”

When: Coldplay: Saturday, September 29th, 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm, Beyonce: Saturday, September 29th, 8:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Film: The Boston Latino International Film Festival (BLIFF)

Throughout the year, Boston hosts a variety of interesting and eye-opening international film festivals, and the BLIFF is no exception. This celebration of Latin culture will feature documentaries as well as full length and short films that explore Latino-related topics. The film festival is an exciting opportunity to get a glimpse of Latino culture through the eyes of members of the Latino community in the United States and other Spanish speaking countries. 28 films will be screened at 4 different locations around the city, this Thursday through Sunday. Admission is free!

When: Thursday, Sep 27th, 7:00 pm - Sunday, Sep 30th, 9:00 pm

 

Art: SoWa Artists Market

Every Sunday, the artist studios in Boston's SoWa district open to the public at the SoWa Open Market. The South End becomes busy with artists showcasing their work and art lovers browsing their studios to find that special piece. On Harrison Avenue, four floors of artist studios are open, displaying paintings, sculptures, drawings, and other crafts. While you're at visiting the artist studios, be sure to check out the SoWa farmers market or food trucks bazaar, after a long morning of art spectating, you'll be hungry for lunch!

When: Sunday, September 30th, 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Art: Boston's Women's Market 

Boston's Women's Market is celebrating its one year anniversary! This market, located in the Seaport District, showcases work made strictly by local female artists and entrepreneurs. Shoppers can find everything from jewelry, to candles, to body lotions, ceramics, clothes and more. Come to support New England's inspiring female entrepreneurs and stay to explore Seaport and the sights along Boston's beautiful waterfront. 

When: Sunday, September 30th, 12:30 pm - 4:30 pm (District Hall - 75 Northern Ave, Boston)

We hope you see or hear something interesting this weekend! Share all your adventures with us by using #HomestayBoston!

Fall Fun: Apple Picking Near Boston!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Sunday, September 16, 2018

Fall Fun: Apple Picking Near Boston!

It’s that time of year again – the Summer weather is changing and in just a few shorts weeks it will officially be Fall. If you’re lucky enough to spend this Autumn in Boston, you can’t miss out on a classic New England activity: apple picking. Here are some PYO apple spots that aren’t too tough to get to from the city.


Belkin Family Lookout Farm

Belkin Farm is actually one of the oldest family farms in the United States and has over 180 acres with 60,000 fruit trees.  The farm offers PYO fruit options both weekdays and weekends. What can you pick? They have a variety of apples from Macintosh, to Golden Supreme, or Golden Delicious, as well as Asian pears, peaches, and plums.  After a day spent in the orchards, 21+ visitors can check out the taproom and try some of Lookout’s beers and ciders, brewed on site using the farms own produce.

Directions:

89 Pleasant St S, Natick, MA 01760

Public Transit: Take the Commuter Rail Framingham Line to Natick Center, then take a ride share service or taxi only a short distance to the farm.


Russell Orchards

Russell Orchards in Ipswich, MA also has a large variety of pick-your-own apples, as well as blueberries and blackberries. The Orchard’s bakery offers a fall staple – apple cider donuts. Like Belkin’s Lookout Farm, Russell Orchards has an added attraction for 21+ guests. The Orchard’s winery holds daily tasting hours and serves wines and hard ciders made right on the premises with their own fruit. If you’re an animal lover, be sure to stop by the barnyard to visit the farm animals! Pet the farm’s adorable bunnies or help feed the pigs and chickens.

Directions:

143 Argilla Rd, Ipswich, MA 01938

Public Transit: Take the Commuter Rail Newburyport Line from North Station to the Ipswich stop. After the farm is only a short ride away via taxi or ride share.


Connors Farm

Connors Farm in Danvers, MA is known for much more than their produce. Aside from apple picking (and other New England favorites like clam chowder), the Farm has a GIANT corn maze built into a different shape each year. This year’s maze is called “Crazy Train” and it looks crazy hard to navigate (seriously, one family got lost and had to call 911 to get themselves out). Connors Farm is also unique in that it hosts special events throughout the season, from “Flashlight Nights” in October to live entertainment and “Hillbilly Pig Races” on the weekends. If you’re into scary movies, you might enjoy Connor’s Farm at Halloween when it transforms into the haunted farm, “Hysteria”. If monsters and evil clowns aren’t your thing, you can always stop by the farm during the day for a much less terrifying experience.  

Directions:

30 Valley Rd, Danvers, MA 01923

Public Transit: Take the Commuter Rail Newburyport Line from North Station to the North Beverly stop. Then, hail a taxi or call a rideshare to the farm.


Smolak Farms

Smolak Farms in North Andover is another quintessential New England Farm. Smolak Farms is probably best known for their farm stand and bakery, which serves homemade goods each morning. On your visit to Smolak Farms be sure to spend time in the pumpkin patch, where you can have your pick at all shapes and sizes of pumpkins. You’ll definitely find the perfect one to display by your front door come October. Smolak Farms also offers daily PYO heirloom and standard apples from their many orchards. They have over 20 different types of apples! Maybe you can try to taste them all…

Directions:

315 S Bradford St, North Andover, MA 01845

Public Transit: Take the Commuter Rail Haverill Line from North Station to the Andover stop, after that it’s only a quick taxi or ride share to the farm.


Are planning to go apple picking with your host family or friends? Share all your fall activities with us by tagging @Globalimmersions or #HomestayBoston on Instagram!

Exploring Boston Trails

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, August 21, 2018


Are you interested in walking or biking along Boston's beautiful scenery? Learning about Boston's intriguing history? Whether you want to take a simple stroll or get your steps in for the day, check out some of these trails!


The Freedom Trail: Follow a red, brick trail through Boston that goes past 16 Revolutionary War landmarks. Walk past the site of the Boston Massacre, the Old North Church, famous burial grounds, where the Boston Tea Party began, Kings Chapel, the Old South Meeting Hall, Paul Revere's Statue and the Bunker Hill monument. 2.5 miles of rich history along this popular trail.


The Emerald Necklace: Walk through 7 miles of  green designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park in New York City. The trail starts at the Boston Common and ends at Franklin Park. It passes by Jamaica Pond and the Arnold Arboretum. 


Minuteman Trail: Learn about the Revolutionary War through this historic trail. Walk along where Paul Revere rode his 'Midnight Ride' in 1775 and see battle grounds such as Meadow Grounds, Tower Park and the Munroe Tavern. This 10 mile trail also has a railroad history from the mid 1800's. The trail connects Cambridge to Bedford starting at Alewife Station and ending at South Road. People use this trail to commute to work on bike as its well-known around the area.

Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway: If you're downtown exploring, take a quick 2 mile walk starting at the North End Park, ending at the Chinatown Park. Along the way, check out Paul Revere's house, a carousel, gardens and public art. This trail was named after President John F. Kennedy, Senator Robert F. Kennedy and Senator Ted Kennedy's mother, Rose F. Kennedy. This trail is accessible by the MBTA through the Aquarium Station, Haymarket Station and South Station.


Southwest Corridor Park / Pierre Lallement Bike Path: Want to walk or bike through Boston? Check out this 4 mile, popular commuter trail for cyclists that runs through the city and runs along Boston's skyscrapers. The path is named after the inventor of the pedal bicycle, Pierre Lallement in 1860. Starting from Dartmouth Street off Mass Turnpike I-90, the path spans through New Washington Street in Jamaica Plain.

South Bay Harbor Trail: Nearly 4 miles, starting at Melnea Cass Blvd. adjacent from Ruggles Station and ending at Pier 4, near the Institution of Contemporary Art, this trail connects many Boston neighborhoods together. Accessible through the MBTA, this trail also includes the Harborwalk displaying Boston's waterfront.

North Bank Bridge: A gorgeous 1/2 mile walk, perfect for Instagram photo opportunities on the bridge over looking Boston. Connecting North Point Park in Cambridge to Paul Revere Park in Charlestown, the path goes underneath the Zakim bridge and above the MBTA tracks.

Want to find more trails to explore? Click here for more Boston trails and here for all Massachusetts trails. 


Happy National Ice Cream Day!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, July 12, 2018

                                                                           

National Ice Cream Day is this Sunday, July 15th!

Ever curious about the difference between soft serve vs. regular ice cream? Here's a little history lesson on the two:

   

Soft Serve 

Who doesn't love the soft, smooth and creamy taste of soft serve ice cream? It was originally invented in 1934 by Tom Carvel after his ice cream truck broke down in Hartsdale, New York.  His ice cream melted, yet customers still bought it. Carvel realized a lighter version of ice cream was a brilliant business idea. He created a secret recipe and opened a store called Carvel  within two years. Dairy Queen  had similar ideas when developing a soft serve recipe in 1938 in Moline, IL.  In a sample tasting of their new product, 1,600 servings were consumed within two hours. Still today, soft serve is a hit among ice cream lovers. It is lower in milk fat and stored at a lower temperature than regular ice cream.  Soft serve is up to 45% air in volume which gives it the fluffiness that melts in your mouth.

Regular Ice Cream 

Variations of ice cream can be traced back centuries to the ancient world.  It began in China around 200 BC where they used a mixture of milk, rice and snow. In 400 BC, Persians ate ice flavored with fruit and rose water. At this time in Ancient Greece, snow with honey and fruit was served at markets in Athens. In Rome, Emperors carried ice from mountains to combine it with fruit. During the sixteenth century, Mughal Emperors in India had ice transported to make fruit sorbets. By the 1600's, ice cream became popular in Europe appearing in recipes in French cookbooks. Ice cream finally reached North America by the mid 1700's as it was introduced by Quaker colonists. Fast forward to the 1840's and ice cream makers were invented in England and America by Agnes Marshall and Nancy Johnson. Today, the average American eats anywhere from 19-23 pounds of ice cream annually. It contains at least 10% milk fat and 16% sweeteners. 12% is milk and 55% is water.



    

Looking for the BEST ice cream in Boston?

There's obviously the infamous Ben & Jerry's,  Emack and Bolio's, and J. P. Lick's, but what about some other local shops?  Here are a few to try around Boston: Gracie's Ice Cream, Christinia's Homemade Ice Cream, Forge Ice Cream Bar,  Lizzy's Ice Cream, Tipping Cow Ice Cream,  BerryLine, Amorino, Toscanini's, Cold Stone Creamery, Juicy Spot Cafe, Blackbird Doughnuts,  Molly Moo's Ice Cream and Cafe.  

Looking for non-dairy options? Try FoMu which serves dairy free ice cream, vegan, gluten free, soy free and kosher sweets.

For more detailed information and the top 10 list check out these links below:

https://www.bostonmagazine.com/restaurants/2018/06/29/best-boston-ice-cream/

https://boston.eater.com/maps/best-new-ice-cream-boston

     

Craving Gelato and the Italian experience

Head to the North End to be transported to Italy to enjoy some delicious gelato.  During the summer, you can stroll the streets of the North End while enjoying a cone without the airfare!  Click here for a list of places in the North End where you can find the best gelato.

Fun Facts about Ice Cream

  • Chocolate ice cream was invented before vanilla
  • Vanilla is the most popular ice cream flavor
  • In Norway, the record for the tallest ice cream cone was over 10 feet tall
  • 90 % of American's have ice cream in their freezer
  • New Zealand consumes the most ice cream
  • A record holding 1.75 gallons of ice cream was eaten in eight minutes 
  • Some of the strangest ice cream flavors are lobster, octopus, horseradish and raw horse flesh... ew!

Whether you're chilling at home or out at the beach, we hope you beat the heat and celebrate a day for eating ice cream!

   


Set up Camp This Summer

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, July 05, 2018

Spend some time in the great outdoors this summer at one of Massachusetts' many camp grounds. Although some of these sites are located only a short distance from Boston, you'll feel miles and miles away from the loud noises of the city. Massachusetts has several different State Parks that are open for camping. You can visit this state website for a full list of camp grounds and to reserve a campsite.

Wompatuck State Park: Hingham, MA

Wompatuck State Park is easily accessible from Boston, just 35 minutes South of the city.  The 3,526 acre park extends from Hingham to the nearby towns of Cohasset, Scituate, and Norwell. The land was originally the property of Indian chief Josiah Wompatuck who gave the land to English Settlers in 1665. During WWII and the Korean War, the land served as an ammunition depot for the U.S. military. Wompatuck offers 262 campsites, of which 140 have electricity. The campground also contains a 12 mile network of bike trails as well as areas for fishing, running, and walking. The park is also pet friendly and a popular spot for dog walking.  

Harold Parker State Forrest: Andover, MA

Only 20 miles North of Boston, Harold Parker State Forest is an ideal campsite for those who want a real "forest" camping experience. Each campsite is spread out so that campers are immersed in the nature and secluded from one another. The camp ground has more than 35 miles of roads and trails that are great for outdoor activities like hiking and biking. Fishing and non-motorized boating are also permitted on any of the campground's 11 ponds. While in the area campers can visit nearby State Parks, such as Bradley State Park, Boxford State Park, Cleveland Farm State Park, and Willowdale State Park.

                                             Salisbury Beach State ReservationSalisbury, MA

Salisbury Beach is a popular tourist destination North of Boston on the New Hampshire border. The State Reservation is a perfect spot for those who want to stay by the beach and don't mind being surrounded by other campers. There are 484 campsites arranged to resemble a small town, completed with lettered streets. The camping experience at Salisbury Beach is therefore very different from a secluded campsite in the forest. Each campsite is a short walk to the ocean and is equipped with water, a picnic table, a BBQ grill and bathroom and shower facilities.

Camp Nihan Education Center: Saugus, MA

Camp Nihan, located in nearby Saugus, MA is the perfect campsite for larger groups. The 65-acre camp ground offers group campsites as well as cabins furnished with bunk beds and a dining area. Camp Nihan also offers free nature education classes to visiting schools and non-profit groups. The area, once a Native American campsite, is home to a variety of wildlife such owls, otters, and turtles. The Saugus river runs through the camp grounds and contains different species of freshwater fish. The campsite is also a short hike away from Breakheart State Reservation, where campers can go for swimming, hiking, and other activities.


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