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Welcome to Boston Homestay - Hitotsubashi University Japanese Group!21-Jul-2019

Global Immersions Homestay welcomed a group from Hitotsubashi University (https://www.hit-u.ac.jp/en..

Welcome to Boston Homestay - Japanese Shimotsuma Daiichi Group at TALK20-Jul-2019

A large group of Japanese visitors from Shimotsuma Daiichi High School arrived to Boston. The group ..


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Fourth of July

Global Immersions Recruiting - Saturday, June 29, 2019

Every year, at the peak of summer, Americans make a great commotion. Throughout the country people gather with family and friends, enjoy music and food, and send bombs bursting in air, lighting the night sky blue, red, and white. In Boston, these celebrations last a full week. It’s been called Independence Day, America’s Birthday, or simply, the Fourth of July. But before the barbecues and parades and fireworks; before the states even were, or could be, united as one, 56 delegates from the 13 British colonies of America committed treason against the British crown. 

By June 7th, 1776, war raged in the colonies for over a year. At this point, the escalating violence and Thomas Paine’s bestseller “Common Sense” had shifted the views of colonists. Where once the idea of complete Independence from Britain seemed extreme, widespread support for revolution resulted in a meeting of delegates from each colony. From Massachusetts, John Hancock, Sam Adams, John Adams, Robert Paine, and Elbridge Gerry joined fellow members of the Continental Congress in the sweltering summer heat of the Pennsylvania Statehouse. It was Richard Henry Lee from Virginia who first officially put forth the motion to declare independence from Britain. Debate ensued, and the meeting adjourned. But not before delegates Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston were tasked with drafting an official document to explain their reasons for defiance. They wrote:

“When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another...a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.”



And that’s what they did. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress met again and the motion was passed. Two days of revisions followed, and on July 4th, 1776, The Declaration of Independence was formally adopted. Though war continued for five more years, the Treaty of Paris officially declared peace another year later, and the Constitution of the United States was ratified in 1788, the celebration of the nation’s birth marks the anniversary of that July 4th meeting in 1776. Were the course of events different, and the war lost, the 56 men involved would have been jailed, executed, and forever branded traitors of an empire. Instead, their words were read aloud throughout the colonies, inspiring hope, resilience, and bravery in the face of oppression.



And so, every year around July 4th, Americans make a great commotion. It’s a time of celebration, community, and leisure. Amid the oohs and aahs associated with fireworks over the Charles River, it can also be a time of reflection. A time to think about such things as self evident truths and inalienable rights. What do the words “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” mean to you? In Boston, a city rich with history, the spirit of those words is embedded in the very culture. There are few better places to celebrate Independence Day. Make sure to check out the list of events below!


Events

July 1st - 7th: The 38th Annual Boston Harborfest


July 1st - 7th (12pm - 1pm): Changing of the Guard Ceremony - Historical reenactment of colonists and redcoats interacting at the corner of Washington and Summer St. 

July 1st (11am - 7pm): Arts at Harborfest - Join local artists as they display their work at Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park.


July 2nd (11am - 1pm): Harborfest Opening Ceremony - Come see the Mayor of the city speak and cut the ceremonial cake outside Faneuil Hall Marketplace.


July 2nd (11am - 2pm): Chowderfest - Vote for your favorite chowder at Downtown Crossing and enjoy all kinds of live games and entertainment. 


July 2nd (8:25pm - 9pm): Parade of Lights and Fireworks - Finish the day with a brilliant light show at Christopher Columbus Park and Fan Pier. 

July 3rd - 4th (8pm - 11pm): Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular - Grammy, Emmy, Golden Globe winner, and Academy Award Nominee Queen Latifa performs along with acclaimed singer songwriter Arlo Guthrie. July 3rd event includes musical performances without fireworks. July 4th event includes musical performances and fireworks.

Sources: BostonUSA, Harborfest, History, USHistory

Memorial Day Then and Now

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, May 24, 2019


Happy Memorial Day weekend everyone! Memorial Day is an American holiday dedicated to honor the men and women who have sacrificed their lives while serving in the United States military. Celebrated on the last Monday in May, this year across the country we will commemorate Memorial Day on Monday, May 27th.



Memorial Day was originally born from the American Civil War, as a way to respect and honor those who had fallen to protect their country. The American Civil war took more American lives than any other U.S. conflict and resulting in the establishment of America’s first national cemeteries. Back then, the holiday was named Decoration Day and was proclaimed on May 5, 1868 by national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, General John Logan to be on May 30th “designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion…”. The first Memorial Day commemoration took place at Arlington National Cemetery where 5,000 citizens came to honor more than 20,000 fallen Union and Confederate soldiers. New York was the first state to officiate the holiday in 1873 and was quickly adopted by the northern states by 1890. The South celebrated and remembered their dead on a different day. However, after World War I, the holiday was changed from honoring only the fallen from the Civil War, to honoring American deaths in all and any war. After the congressional National Holiday Act of 1971, Memorial Day is celebrated by almost every state as a three day weekend.



Everyone chooses to celebrate or remember those who they have lost in different ways. However, there are a few universal traditions that are historically used to commemorate Memorial Day. First, is the National Moment of Remembrance. Passed in December 2000, this resolution asks that at 3 PM local time on Memorial Day for all American citizens to pause for a moment of silence or listen to the song ‘Taps’ as a way to honor our fallen soldiers. Another quintessential part of Memorial Day is the symbol of poppy flowers. Started by poet Moina Michael in 1915, wearing red poppy flowers has become a way to recognize, show appreciation for, and honor those who have sacrificed their lives for our country. Americans will also visit memorials and cemeteries on Memorial Day, leaving flowers, flags, and notes to show their appreciation. Many towns and cities will have Memorial Day parades to honor local military families and encourage patriotism. The largest and most decorated parades take places in New York, Chicago, and Washington D.C. It is also common to make patriotically decorated food for Memorial Day barbecues as a small reminder of the sacrifices our military has made for us.



If you are in Boston for the weekend, make sure to visit Boston Common for the Massachusetts Military Heroes Garden of Flags display. The Common will be decorated with more than 37,000 American flags to represent and commemorate each of the Massachusetts soldiers who have given their lives to protect our nation’s freedom. Additionally, on Saturday May 25, Veterans Memorial Park in Boston’s Fenway neighborhood will be celebrating the holiday with their 73rd Annual Memorial Day Service at 11 AM.


As always, we want to see how you celebrate! Please send us your favorite Memorial Day memories and traditions by sharing with us @globalimmersions or using #HomestayBoston.


Happy Mother's Day!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, May 08, 2019


Mother’s Day is celebrated by different countries and cultures around the globe as a way to recognize and show gratitude for all that mothers and mother figures do. In the United States, we traditionally celebrate the holiday on the second Sunday in the month of May. (For those of you who have not checked the calendar, Mother’s Day is this upcoming Sunday, May 12th!) The holiday was incarnated by Anna Jarvis to the United States in 1908 and became an official holiday in 1914. Countries such as Canada and Australia celebrate the second Sunday in May as well. However, other countries celebrate an equivalent Mother’s Day holiday during different months of the year. The map below shows which months countries around the world observe the holiday.




For example, countries like Egypt or other Arab countries typically celebrate the holiday around March 21st to celebrate with the marked beginning of Spring. Countries like Japan and India have chosen to import the westernized holiday and celebrate Mother’s Day in Spring. Most of Western Europe celebrates the holiday in May, while the United Kingdom and Eastern Europe choose to celebrate in March. Although these countries celebrate at different times, most of their gifts and celebrations are actually the same! The most common customs are giving thoughtful cards and presenting flowers to mothers. For instance, in Thailand, the most common flower to give a mother is jasmine! In the United Kingdom, Mother’s Day has many historical and religious roots to Christianity and a former celebration called Mothering Sunday that was celebrated on the fourth Sunday in Lent. To this day the churches will hand out daffodils for young children to give to their moms. In the U.K. it is also customary to make mothers fruitcake!

There are other ways of giving as well. A favorite tradition in the United States is to make your mother her favorite breakfast foods and bring the dishes on a tray to her bed. This way she is able to relax and enjoy her morning. Many families will have extended family or close friends over to celebrate. Other common gifts may include jewelry, clothing, and family photos. Click here for homemade gift ideas! The most important advice when choosing a gift for Mother’s Day is to be thoughtful and think about what acts of appreciation would mean the most to her.

On behalf of our family here at Global Immersions, we would like to wish a happy Mother’s Day to all of our host mothers! We appreciate you and all that you do. Please share your favorite Mother's Day memories with us @globalimmersions or using #HomestayBoston.


Sources: TimeandDate, Time, Scholastic, History


Marathon Monday in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, April 11, 2019


It is almost that time of the year again for...Marathon Monday! This year the Boston Marathon will take place on Monday April 15th with the first heat of racers leaving from Hopkinton at 9am. All Maine and Boston schools have the day off for Patriot’s Day, and many adults take work off to show support for the event! In addition to the marathon, the Boston Red Sox also host their annual home opener on Patriot’s Day in the morning and live stream the race for all fans to see!



The marathon typically draws 500,000 spectators and more than 35,000 runners, making it one of the biggest Boston events of the year since its opening race in 1897. To even qualify for the marathon, racers must have finished races within a range of 3-4 hours depending on age, gender, or other classifications. The race also has a wheelchair division! Those who do not qualify but would still like to race, must raise between $5,000 and $7,500 in order to compete. Many former professional athletes and celebrities compete in the race, too! This year some big names include Olympic gold medal gymnast Shawn Johnson with her husband Andrew East from the NFL, as well as Jared and Genevieve Padalecki from Supernatural.


Interested in watching the marathon and cheering on the runners? Here are some of our favorite spectating spots!



First up is the Scream Tunnel located near Wellesley College, around 13 miles into the race. Since 1897, the women of Wellesley have notoriously cheered on runners so enthusiastically that runners can hear the cheers from over a mile away! The Scream Tunnel is an infamous half-way spectating spot that you can only hear to believe. There is one tradition where fans will offer kisses to passing runners.



Our second spectating spot is located at the Newton Firehouse. Located at mile 16 of the race, hundreds of spectators gather around the firehouse to cheer on racers as they make a right hand turn to begin the climb into Newton’s hills.



A third famous cheering section is located at Heartbreak Hill between miles 20 and 21 of the marathon near Boston College. Although not particularly steep, the marathoners are beginning their final 5 mile stretch to the finish line and need the extra encouragement as they begin to tire. Spectators line the hill cheering on the runners to get them up the hill as quickly as possible!



Our fourth and final spectator spot, new this year, is Fan Fest in Copley Square. Thousands of spectators will gather in Copley to cheer on racers as they are about to cross the finish line. This year, Fan Fest will be hosting live music, promotional activities, sponsors, and more!


Click the link here for the marathon map and more details on the event. Wherever you may be watching from, we would love to see you celebrate! Share your favorite moments with us @globalimmersions or using #HomestayBoston.


Sources: BAA, Accel, RunnersWorld, Boston, Abbott, History


Valentine's Day in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Happy Valentine’s Day everyone! Every mid-February, people around the world gather with loved ones to celebrate. In the United States and most western cultures, we celebrate Valentine’s Day on February 14th! Originally named after Valentine, the Saint of courtly love, this holiday is all about showing affection and appreciation to those closest to you. There are many versions of the story as to how Valentine’s Day came about. The most common tale is that the holiday first became associated with love and romance during the Middle Ages in England as spring mating season began. Valentine’s Day also has inspiration from a Roman pagan festival called Lupercalia that celebrated fertility and matchmaking. Nowadays, we associate the holiday with pink and red hearts, roses, and candy. You will also see figures of Cupid, the God of love, as a small figure flying with a bow and arrow. Legend says those who are shot with his arrow will fall madly in love with their partner.


In the modern day, Valentine’s Day is most commonly celebrated between romantic partners as a way to commemorate the relationship and the love the two share. Every Valentine’s Day is the most popular date night in town! Some people will plan their engagement proposals or weddings on Valentine’s Day to join the romantic spirit. However, many people also celebrate Valentine’s Day with friends and family. It is tradition to give your loved ones Valentine’s Day cards, flowers, or sweets like chocolate or candy as a way to show your appreciation for them. Kids in school often make handwritten Valentine’s Day notes expressing their favorite thing about each classmate. Every student has their own decorated box, and they take turns dropping off notes for each other! Valentine’s Day can also be a day for secret admirers. Many people will finally confess their love for those they have been crushing on as a romantic gesture. Overall the holiday is meant to tell others how special they are and how much they mean to us.




Although not a national holiday, you will see recognition of Valentine’s Day all around you in Boston! Many people will dress in pink or red clothing, bakeries will make special pastries, and people will gift flowers and chocolates to their loved ones. Make sure to check out the decorated Tunnel of Love at Christopher Columbus Park this month! They will light up the decorated tunnel every night now until February 28. Wherever you may be celebrating from, we want to see how you will be spending your Valentine’s Day. Share your experiences with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!


Sources: History, TimeandDate


Lunar New Year - Year of the Pig

Global Immersions Recruiting - Saturday, February 09, 2019


Happy Lunar New Year everyone! The Lunar New Year celebration, also known as the Spring Festival, started on Tuesday, February 5th this calendar year and will end with the Lantern Festival on Tuesday, February 19th. As the most important festivity in countries like China, North and South Korea, and Vietnam, this holiday alone is celebrated by more than 20% of the world’s population! Not to mention that more fireworks are set off on the Lunar New Year than any other day of the year. This is is the most important time for celebrating families all over the world to gather together to welcome spring and share in one another’s company.



This Lunar New Year is the Year of the Pig, which is often seen as a symbol of wealth, diligence, kindness, and generosity. Each Lunar New Year cycle is characterized by one of the  twelve zodiac animals, as well as the five elements of earth. The year you are born and your Zodiac can help predict your fortune, marriage and career compatibility, and so much more.  This Year of the Pig overlaps with the Earth element. So according to the Zodiac, Pigs born in 2019, are predicted to be outgoing, supported by loved ones, and fortunate. Lucky colors include yellow, gray and brown. Lucky numbers are 2, 5, 8. Curious to know your Zodiac sign? Click here to find out!



As family come from all over to celebrate for two weeks, The Lunar New Year has some of the best food recipes and traditions too. Many meals are designed to provide specific blessings for the upcoming year. Certain food groups and dishes have symbolic powers to bring prosperity, fertility, and happiness. For example, eggs are known for big happy families and lobster is known for financial prosperity. Some traditional meals may include spring rolls, dumplings, noodles, steamed fish and chicken, rice cakes, vegetables, and hot pots. There is even special wine saved just for the occasion. Each family has their own favorites and traditions! You will notice that the color red dominates the Lunar New Year celebration. Red lanterns, red string, red clothing. Another famous tradition is to exchange gifts, particularly red envelopes that are filled with money! Most commonly these red envelopes are passed from the elderly to children, symbolically passing along fortune to the youngest generation. However, the envelopes can also be passed between friends, family, and even co-workers.The new year celebration will continue until the Lantern Festival when everyone socializes in the streets, plays games, and lights lantern to celebrate the new year. We want to see you celebrate! Share your Lunar New Year experiences with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!


Sources: Chinese New Year


New England Patriots in the Super Bowl

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, January 30, 2019


This weekend tune in for SUPER BOWL SUNDAY on February 3 at 6:30 PM! Super Bowl Sunday has practically become a national holiday here in the United States. Whether you watch football regularly every week or don’t know the difference between a touchdown and a field goal, everyone watches this football game. Last year alone, more than 103.4 million people watched the game via NBC broadcast. It is one of the best American traditions! Once a year, people join together with friends, make delicious foods, and camp out in front of the television on Sunday afternoon to watch the game. Not a sports fan? You can look forward to the musical half-time show, this year starring Maroon 5, Travis Scott, and Big Boi as well as the famous half-time commercials.There is something entertaining for everyone to watch.



What’s more, this Super Bowl LIII we are able to cheer on our very own Boston team, the New England Patriots! For the third year in a row, the Patriots will compete for the Super Bowl championship title.The Pats have just broken a record for the most Super Bowl appearances, this being their 11th! And our star quarterback, Tom Brady, currently holds the record for more appearances than any one player, with nine championship games this year. The Patriots defeated the Los Angeles Rams in Super Bowl XXXVI way back in 2002, with the same coach and quarterback as we have now. The Rams have completely changed their team structure since then, so this should be a competitive game. The Patriots will face off against the Rams at the Mercedes-Benz stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. All major news stations will be covering the event. The only commitment you have to make is which spot on the couch you want to watch the game!


To ensure that you have the most American Super Bowl experience, these are a few of our favorite recipes to try for the big day. Here’s the game plan. Think appetizers. (And make sure to bring extra napkins.)

Wings

They can be slow to make, but worth the wait! Whether BBQ, Buffalo, or Garlic Parmesan, these wings are a staple dish at any Super Bowl get together.

Barbecue Chicken Nachos

Great for the family to share or to bring for a party at your friend’s place. Everyone loves nachos.

Best Dips

Anything that goes with chips, will be a hit. From onion dip, to salsa, to guacamole, try these dip recipes for the Super Bowl!


Wherever you may be watching from, we want to see you in your New England Patriots gear! Share your Super Bowl spirit with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!


Sources:

CBS Sports

Statista

Ring in the New Year in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, December 28, 2018

It’s hard to believe that 2018 is already coming to an end. In just a few days Bostonians will celebrate the New Year with parties, fireworks, and family gatherings. How will you celebrate the New Year? New Year’s Eve, or First Night, is a popular holiday in Boston, with the city hosting several free and festive events to commemorate the start of 2019! If you don’t have NYE plans yet, here are some ways you can ring in the New Year in Boston.


Frog Pond Skating Spectacular

 On December 31st at 5: 00 pm, the Skating Club of Boston will host a free figure skating show at Boston Commons’ Frog Pond. This annual show features performances by national and international competitive figure skaters from the Skating Club of Boston as well as other soloists, groups, amateur, and beginner skaters, and The Skating Club of Boston’s synchronized skating and Theater on Ice teams. One exciting aspect of this year’s show is that it will be headlined by Olympic medalist, Ashley Wagner. After the show, turn your attention to the Common’s to watch the Mugar Family Fireworks display, beginning at 7: 00 pm.


First Night Boston 

First Night festivities will begin at noon on New Year’s Eve with live musical performances at Copley Square and the Prudential Center. There will also be arts & crafts, a puppet show, and cultural performances for younger children. Later in the evening, guests can view illuminated ice sculptures before making their way to Boston Common for the night’s first fireworks display. Musical performances are scheduled throughout the night and the event cumulates with a midnight pyrotechnics and light show. Those present at Copley Square can participate in the midnight countdown, followed by a “multi-sensory display of music, lights, and pyrotechnics”. You can find a complete schedule of performances here.


Boston Harbor Fireworks

Boston will also host a firework display between Long Wharf and Fan Pier by the city’s waterfront. The event will begin at 11:59 pm on December 31st to bring you into the New Year with an exciting firework show. As the harbor is expected to become crowded, the best spots to see fireworks and escape large crowds are at Christopher Columbus Park in the North End, at Fan Pier in the Seaport District and from the East Boston Harborwalk.

First Day

The celebrations don’t stop on New Year’s Eve. On January 1st, Boston hosts First Day events, too. Spend the first day of 2019 at Copley Square, partaking in different activities for family and children. The event runs from 12: 00 pm – 4: 00 pm and is free and open to the public.

Happy New Year to all our host families and international visitors! We hope your 2018 was filled with new and exciting experiences. Share your favorite memories from the past year with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Veteran's Day in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, November 08, 2018

Sunday is Veterans Day, the federal holiday that honors and celebrates those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Veterans Day falls on the same day as Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are observed in other countries to commemorate the anniversary of the end of World War I. Veterans Day always falls on November 11th, as World War I ended at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. The holiday became official in 1954 after Armistice Day in the U.S. was renamed to Veterans  Day. Boston has a lot of events happening this week in honor of Veterans Day. Here are a few of the highlights: 


Veterans Day Parades                               

Boston has two annual Veteran’s Day Parades. The Boston Veteran’s Day Parade and the Veteran’s Peace Parade. The “original” Veterans Day celebration, the Veteran’s Day Parade, takes place on November 11th at the corner of Boylston and Tremont streets. The parade route continues on to City Hall Plaza and Faneuil Hall next to the statue of Sam Adams. The Parade features a variety of different participants, from ROTC groups to Veteran’s organizations, honorary militias, and marching bands. The Peace Parade follows a similar route, beginning shortly after the first parade. The Peace Parade also features a similar group of marching bands and veteran’s groups, however, it focuses more on the original intention of Armistice Day, as a celebration of Peace. Spectators can expect to see signs and banners promoting peace and non-violent solutions to wars or conflict. The Peace Parade was founded in 1985 by Veterans for Peace, an organization dedicated to increasing awareness about the harsh realities of war. At the conclusion of each parade, parade-goers are welcome to gather by the statute of Sam Adams to listen to speeches, anti-war reading, poetry, and music.


Veteran’s Day Harbor Cruise

The Harbor Cruise is a popular Veteran's Day tradition for both military and non-military families. On Saturday, November 10th, families are invited to tour Fort Warren on Georges Island to learn of Boston’s centuries-long military history, from the American Revolution through the Civil War and up to present day, while honoring past and present soldiers. The cruise departs from the Charlestown Navy Yard and from Long Wharf at 11:00 am and return at 3:00 pm.  Tickets are $10 for non-military members and free for active duty military members and up to three of their family members. To make sure you (and your host family) get a spot on the cruise, register here. 


Charity Walks & Runs

Two charity race take place this Veteran’s Day Weekend- the Dav 5K and Somerville Honor Run. The Dav 5K is a walk, run, or motorcycle race that honors those who have served and raises awareness of the issues and illnesses that military veterans may face. The event takes place on Boston’s Castle Island at 9:00 am on November 10th. The proceeds from the Dav 5K are used to support local organizations for veteran’s and their families. The second race, the Somerville Honor Runbenefits Somerville's George Dilboy VFW Post #529 and honors all those men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces. The event starts at 9:00 am on November 11th in Davis Square and consists of a 4-mile route. All participants get a long sleeve running shirt and entry to the post-race block party, where local restaurants and breweries will be providing refreshments. You can get your ticket to the race here.

We hope you enjoy your long weekend, and to the veterans in our host network – we thank you for your service! 


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