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Chinese New Year

Global Immersions - Tuesday, January 24, 2012

This past Monday, January 23rd, was the Chinese New Year, also known as “Spring Festival”. It marks the end of the winter season and the beginning of spring. The festival begins on the first day of the first month on the Chinese lunar calendar and ends on the 15th day with the Lantern Festival and is celebrated in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam and Chinatowns around the world.

Most people are familiar with the 12 zodiacs: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, and Pig. What people may not be so familiar with is that each zodiac has five different elements: Metal, Water, Wood, Fire, and Earth. This year is the Water Dragon, which is the more calming Dragon of the group. The Dragon is also considered to be the luckiest year in the Chinese Zodiac.

There are many customs and traditions that take place during the celebration such as thoroughly cleaning houses to sweep away bad fortune and hanging red colored paper cuts on doors and windows symbolizing good fortune, wealth, happiness, and longevity.

Chinese New Year is widely celebrated around the world and is the most important of the Chinese holidays!

Happy Chinese New Year!


For a more basic understanding of what happens on Chinese New Year, click here!

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_New_Year

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/chinesenewyear1.html

New Year’s Eve in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, December 16, 2011

When it comes to celebrating New Year’s Eve, there is nowhere in the US more original and community-oriented than the First Night festival in Boston. For the past 35 years, Boston’s vibrant art scene has provided over a million people annually with all day and night entertainment throughout the city. Showcasing 1,000 artists with 200 performances and exhibits, the festival offers a broad range of lively music, dance, theater, visual art, and film programs. First Night also emphasizes community-building and celebrating diversity by delivering “high-quality arts programs to large diverse audiences, offering vital arts education opportunities to underserved children and teenagers”.

Encompassing more than 30 venues throughout the city, the signature Boston event is the oldest and largest of its kind in North America. The traditional festivities feature events such as a Family Festival at the Hynes Convention Center, a Grand Procession down Boylston Street, ice sculptures, fireworks, and more.

For more information and details about First Night, visit their website at http://www.firstnight.org/ 

December Festivities

Global Immersions - Monday, November 21, 2011

December is the time to celebrate the holiday season and in Boston there are many ways to enjoy and celebrate while learning about U.S. culture! From the Christmas tree lighting and the lighting of the Menorah on Boston Common to the Nutcracker ballet, take a look at a few happenings our city has to offer for the holiday-filled month – then get out and enjoy!

Christmas Tree Lighting

This year marks the 70th annual lighting of Boston’s official Christmas tree in Boston Common, a gift from Nova Scotia, Canada. On Thursday, December 1st, join the festivities from 6:00-8:00pm.  The evening includes various performances by the Radio City Rockettes to the Boston Children’s choir as well as a performance by local skaters on the Boston Common Frog Pond.   

 

Ice Skating on the Frog Pond

The Boston Common Frog Pond is located in the heart of Boston Common. For a small entrance fee, ice skaters 14-years and older can skate for as long as they like and for everyone else in the heart of downtown Boston.  Keep checking the website for an update on opening day (delayed due to warm weather)! http://www.bostonfrogpond.com/winter-programs

 

Menorah Lighting

A giant menorah is lit for a sequence of eight days to celebrate the Jewish holiday Hanukkah in the Boston Common at the Brewer Fountain.  This year, Hanukkah begins at sunset on December 20th and ends at sunset on December 28th. The lighting of the Menorah will begin at 4:30pm and will occur each night at that time. There will also be special presentations and entertainment during Hanukkah. 

The Nutcracker Ballet

The Nutcracker is the perfect holiday event. With beautiful music written by Peter Ilych Tchaikovsky, it is undeniably a performance that the whole family will love. Performances until December 31st, 2011. Click the link below to book your tickets! http://boxoffice.bostonballet.org/storefront/c2012NUTCRACKER-p0.html

 

For other holiday events happening in Boston, discounted tickets and more - check out The Mayor’s Holiday Special: http://www.mayorsholidayspecial.com/ 

Enjoy and happy holidays!

 

Sources:

http://www.bostoncentral.com/events/boston-official-tree-lighting/p888.php

http://www.artsboston.org/event/detail/441458672

Holidays Around The World in November

Global Immersions - Monday, November 07, 2011

Americans associate the month of November with Thanksgiving as it celebrated by all Americans regardless of religion.  What other global holidays are there during November? Let’s take a look!

Thanksgiving Day – United States of America

The modern Thanksgiving holiday traces its roots back to 1621 at Plymouth. In 1621 the Thanksgiving feast was prompted by the colonists’ successful harvest. The Plymouth colony did not have enough food to support half of the colony and so the Wampanoag Native Americans provided seeds and taught the pilgrims to fish. The feast did not become an annual festivity until the late 1660s. The feast was to give thanks for a good harvest and for the hard work done in communities. In the beginning of the 20th century Thanksgiving fell on the final Thursday of November. President Abraham Lincoln, in order to create a sense of unity between the Northern and Southern states, declared that the final Thursday would be reserved for Thanksgiving. However, on December 26th 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the date to the fourth Thursday of November through federal legislation. His reason for doing so was to give the country an economic boost because the last Thursday of November fell too closely to Christmas.

Kinrō Kansha no Hi (Labor Thanksgiving Day) - Japan

On the 23rd of November, Japan celebrates labor and production and giving one another thanks. Labor Thanksgiving Day (Kinrō Kansha no Hi) is the modern day name for Niiname-sai (Harvest Festival) and was held in the imperial court. In the ritual, the Emperor makes the season’s first offering of harvested rice to the gods and then eats the rice himself. The oldest written account of the holiday dates back to 720, which says that a Harvest Festival took place in November 678. The actual origin, however, is said to date back even longer, possibly 2,000 years back when rice was first cultivated. After World War II, Labor Thanksgiving Day was marked as a national holiday to mark the fact that fundamental human and expansion of workers rights were guaranteed.

Eid al-Adha (Feast of Sacrifice) – Observed by Muslims around the world

Eid al-Adha is a religious holiday that lasts for three days and is celebrated all across the world by Muslims commemorating Ibrahim’s willingness to sacrifice his only son, Ishmael, for God as an act of obedience. God spared Ishmael and provided a ram to sacrifice instead. Muslims commemorate this holiday by slaughtering a sheep, camel, or cow. One third of the meat is distributed to the poor, another third is to neighbors and relatives, and the last third to be kept within the family who offered the sacrifice. Eid al-Adha takes place on the 10th and last day of the Hajj (the celebration of holy pilgrimage to Mecca) in the 12 month of the Islamic lunar calendar. In the year 2011, the celebration was on November 6th on Western calendars.

Independencia de Cartagena (Independence of Cartagena) – Colombia

On November 11, 1811, Cartagena became the first province to declare independence from the Spanish Crown. The holiday is officially celebrated on the Monday closest to November 11th, though festivals and street fairs take place for days around the actual holiday. The “November Feasts” consist of parade floats and dancers inspired by African and Caribbean rhythms. Foam, paint, water, and flour are typically thrown during the street festivals at anyone who may look remotely clean. Concurso Nacional de Belleza (National Beauty Contest) is held at the same time as the Independence holiday. This event is more of a commercial event where the coronation of the next Miss Colombia takes place. With these two major events occurring at the same time, one can only imagine how crazy Cartagena can get before and on November 11th!

Do you know of any other holidays that occur in November?  Tell us how you celebrate any of these holidays in your country!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eid_al-Adha

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labour_Thanksgiving_Day

http://www.colombia.travel/en/international-tourist/sightseeing-what-to-do/history-and-tradition/fairs-and-festivals/november/independence-of-cartagena-and-national-beauty-pageant

Cultural Events - DÜNYA Concert

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 21, 2011

In order to provide both our hosts and visitors with additional information about the many cultural events and locations in Boston, the Local Ethnic Resources and Cultural Events guides will highlight some of the more unique and diverse spots around town. From little-known ethnic grocery stores to big-name musical shows, Bostonians and visitors alike can use the guides to enjoy more of what Boston has to offer.

Next weekend, be sure to check out the special CD release concert of DÜNYA's A Story of the City: Constantinople, Istanbul, which is currently on the Grammy ballot. DÜNYA Organization's goal is to present a contemporary view of a wide range of Turkish traditions, alone and in interaction with other world traditions, through performance, publication and other educational activities. The concert will bring together several DÜNYA ensembles to perform upbeat selections from the CD program including Turkish, Greek, Armenian, Sephardic Jewish and Ottoman music.

To find out more about DÜNYA visit their website at: http://www.dunyainc.org/

DÜNYA Special CD Release Concert

Location: First Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden St. Cambridge, MA
Date/Time: Saturday, October 1, 8pm
Price of Admission: General $15, Students/Seniors $10


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