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Welcome to Boston Homestay - Ritsumeikan University!09-Feb-2020

Global Immersions Homestay welcomed a group of college students from Ritsumeikan University (http://..

Welcome to Boston Homestay - SHOWA February Group02-Feb-2020

Global Immersions welcomed a group of female Japanese visitors from SHOWA Boston (https://showabosto..


Best in Hospitality

Happy Mother's Day!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, May 08, 2019


Mother’s Day is celebrated by different countries and cultures around the globe as a way to recognize and show gratitude for all that mothers and mother figures do. In the United States, we traditionally celebrate the holiday on the second Sunday in the month of May. (For those of you who have not checked the calendar, Mother’s Day is this upcoming Sunday, May 12th!) The holiday was incarnated by Anna Jarvis to the United States in 1908 and became an official holiday in 1914. Countries such as Canada and Australia celebrate the second Sunday in May as well. However, other countries celebrate an equivalent Mother’s Day holiday during different months of the year. The map below shows which months countries around the world observe the holiday.




For example, countries like Egypt or other Arab countries typically celebrate the holiday around March 21st to celebrate with the marked beginning of Spring. Countries like Japan and India have chosen to import the westernized holiday and celebrate Mother’s Day in Spring. Most of Western Europe celebrates the holiday in May, while the United Kingdom and Eastern Europe choose to celebrate in March. Although these countries celebrate at different times, most of their gifts and celebrations are actually the same! The most common customs are giving thoughtful cards and presenting flowers to mothers. For instance, in Thailand, the most common flower to give a mother is jasmine! In the United Kingdom, Mother’s Day has many historical and religious roots to Christianity and a former celebration called Mothering Sunday that was celebrated on the fourth Sunday in Lent. To this day the churches will hand out daffodils for young children to give to their moms. In the U.K. it is also customary to make mothers fruitcake!

There are other ways of giving as well. A favorite tradition in the United States is to make your mother her favorite breakfast foods and bring the dishes on a tray to her bed. This way she is able to relax and enjoy her morning. Many families will have extended family or close friends over to celebrate. Other common gifts may include jewelry, clothing, and family photos. Click here for homemade gift ideas! The most important advice when choosing a gift for Mother’s Day is to be thoughtful and think about what acts of appreciation would mean the most to her.

On behalf of our family here at Global Immersions, we would like to wish a happy Mother’s Day to all of our host mothers! We appreciate you and all that you do. Please share your favorite Mother's Day memories with us @globalimmersions or using #HomestayBoston.


Sources: TimeandDate, Time, Scholastic, History


Marathon Monday in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, April 11, 2019


It is almost that time of the year again for...Marathon Monday! This year the Boston Marathon will take place on Monday April 15th with the first heat of racers leaving from Hopkinton at 9am. All Maine and Boston schools have the day off for Patriot’s Day, and many adults take work off to show support for the event! In addition to the marathon, the Boston Red Sox also host their annual home opener on Patriot’s Day in the morning and live stream the race for all fans to see!



The marathon typically draws 500,000 spectators and more than 35,000 runners, making it one of the biggest Boston events of the year since its opening race in 1897. To even qualify for the marathon, racers must have finished races within a range of 3-4 hours depending on age, gender, or other classifications. The race also has a wheelchair division! Those who do not qualify but would still like to race, must raise between $5,000 and $7,500 in order to compete. Many former professional athletes and celebrities compete in the race, too! This year some big names include Olympic gold medal gymnast Shawn Johnson with her husband Andrew East from the NFL, as well as Jared and Genevieve Padalecki from Supernatural.


Interested in watching the marathon and cheering on the runners? Here are some of our favorite spectating spots!



First up is the Scream Tunnel located near Wellesley College, around 13 miles into the race. Since 1897, the women of Wellesley have notoriously cheered on runners so enthusiastically that runners can hear the cheers from over a mile away! The Scream Tunnel is an infamous half-way spectating spot that you can only hear to believe. There is one tradition where fans will offer kisses to passing runners.



Our second spectating spot is located at the Newton Firehouse. Located at mile 16 of the race, hundreds of spectators gather around the firehouse to cheer on racers as they make a right hand turn to begin the climb into Newton’s hills.



A third famous cheering section is located at Heartbreak Hill between miles 20 and 21 of the marathon near Boston College. Although not particularly steep, the marathoners are beginning their final 5 mile stretch to the finish line and need the extra encouragement as they begin to tire. Spectators line the hill cheering on the runners to get them up the hill as quickly as possible!



Our fourth and final spectator spot, new this year, is Fan Fest in Copley Square. Thousands of spectators will gather in Copley to cheer on racers as they are about to cross the finish line. This year, Fan Fest will be hosting live music, promotional activities, sponsors, and more!


Click the link here for the marathon map and more details on the event. Wherever you may be watching from, we would love to see you celebrate! Share your favorite moments with us @globalimmersions or using #HomestayBoston.


Sources: BAA, Accel, RunnersWorld, Boston, Abbott, History


Happy St. Patrick's Day

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, March 14, 2019


Every year those of Irish ancestry celebrate St. Patrick’s day on March 17th. St. Patrick, the Irish patron saint himself, is commemorated for bringing Christianity to Ireland in the 5th century. Traditionally, the holiday had a religious connotation. The Irish would attend church in the morning and prepare feasts for the afternoon! Although March 17th usually corresponds with the Christian fasting holiday of Lent, the rules would be waived as a tribute to St. Patrick. The holiday has evolved over time and celebrations quickly spread to countries such as the United States where many people identify with Irish descent.




America is responsible for the first St. Patrick’s day parade in New York in 1762. More than 100 St. Patrick’s day parades are held across the United States annually, including cities such as Boston, New York City, Chicago, and Savannah! Chicago is known for celebrating the holiday by temporarily coloring the Chicago River green for about five hours. In the holiday’s home city of Dublin, Ireland, more than one million people take part in the St. Patrick festivities.  



There are many symbols associated with the holiday. If this is your first time celebrating St. Patrick’s day, the most important social cue to follow is to wear all things green! The tradition of wearing green began in the 17th century as Irish immigrants to the United States believed that wearing green made one invisible to leprechauns, fairytale creatures who would pinch you otherwise. Leprechauns themselves are symbols of the holiday. Legend says that leprechauns are notoriously mischievous and are depicted as small bearded creatures with a green coat and hat. According to myths, they are most commonly seen at the end of a rainbow with a pot of gold. Further, if you are to catch a leprechaun, he will grant you three wishes! Another important symbol of the holiday is a shamrock. A shamrock is a three-leaved clover said to represent the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit in Christianity. If you find a four-leaved clover, it is said that you will be bestowed with good luck!




Some of the favorite holiday foods include corned beef, cabbage, shepherd's pie, and Irish soda bread. Bakeries will decorate their pastries green and with symbols such as the shamrock noted above. Make sure to head to Boston’s very own St. Patrick’s day parade this Sunday, March 17th starting at 1 PM. Make sure to show us how you celebrate this St. Patrick’s day by using #HomestayBoston or sharing with @globalimmersions!


Sources: History, USA, Brittanica, BHG, Express


FREE Pancakes at IHOP 3/12/19!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Sunday, March 10, 2019

Happy National Pancake Day!

Head over to IHOP on Tuesday, March 12 to celebrate and get your FREE short stack of original buttermilk pancakes and donate to help children battling critical illnesses! Find your nearest IHOP and learn more here.

Do you know the history of Pancake Day? Last Tuesday, March 5, was also Shrove Tuesday. "Shrive" means for one to confess their sins. During the olden days, on the day before Lent, people would use all of their eggs, fat and butter to make pancakes since they would not be eating these foods over the next 6 weeks. Lent is the 40 days preceding Easter in Christian traditions where fasting and food abstaining occurs. Lent began this year on March 6 and ends April 18.


Around the world, different countries celebrate Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day in many ways! In some towns in the U.K., people have pancake races while flipping them in frying pans. In Denmark, the day is called Fastelavn, in which children dress up in costumes and eat Danish style buns. In Canada, their pancakes are filled with objects to predict the future as the ring finder will be married first, the thimble finder will be a seamstress/tailor, the name finder will be a carpenter and the coin finder will become rich. In France, Shrove Tuesday is known as Mardi Gras or "Fat Tuesday", but their pancake day is on February 2nd and called Candlemas. They eat crêpes which are believed to bring a year full of happiness, wealth, health and good crops. Whoever flips their pancake without dropping it on the ground, has good luck for the year. Let us know your Pancake Day traditions in the comments below!


Hosts: Try making pancakes from scratch with your students with this recipe from Food Network! TAG us in your Instagram pictures @globalimmersions and enjoy!


1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

2 large eggs, at room temperature

1 1/4 cups milk, at room temperature

1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed

Sources:

https://www.whyeaster.com/customs/shrovetuesday.shtml

http://blog.english-heritage.org.uk/pancake-day-traditions/

http://projectbritain.com/pancakeday/world.htm

Ring in the New Year in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, December 28, 2018

It’s hard to believe that 2018 is already coming to an end. In just a few days Bostonians will celebrate the New Year with parties, fireworks, and family gatherings. How will you celebrate the New Year? New Year’s Eve, or First Night, is a popular holiday in Boston, with the city hosting several free and festive events to commemorate the start of 2019! If you don’t have NYE plans yet, here are some ways you can ring in the New Year in Boston.


Frog Pond Skating Spectacular

 On December 31st at 5: 00 pm, the Skating Club of Boston will host a free figure skating show at Boston Commons’ Frog Pond. This annual show features performances by national and international competitive figure skaters from the Skating Club of Boston as well as other soloists, groups, amateur, and beginner skaters, and The Skating Club of Boston’s synchronized skating and Theater on Ice teams. One exciting aspect of this year’s show is that it will be headlined by Olympic medalist, Ashley Wagner. After the show, turn your attention to the Common’s to watch the Mugar Family Fireworks display, beginning at 7: 00 pm.


First Night Boston 

First Night festivities will begin at noon on New Year’s Eve with live musical performances at Copley Square and the Prudential Center. There will also be arts & crafts, a puppet show, and cultural performances for younger children. Later in the evening, guests can view illuminated ice sculptures before making their way to Boston Common for the night’s first fireworks display. Musical performances are scheduled throughout the night and the event cumulates with a midnight pyrotechnics and light show. Those present at Copley Square can participate in the midnight countdown, followed by a “multi-sensory display of music, lights, and pyrotechnics”. You can find a complete schedule of performances here.


Boston Harbor Fireworks

Boston will also host a firework display between Long Wharf and Fan Pier by the city’s waterfront. The event will begin at 11:59 pm on December 31st to bring you into the New Year with an exciting firework show. As the harbor is expected to become crowded, the best spots to see fireworks and escape large crowds are at Christopher Columbus Park in the North End, at Fan Pier in the Seaport District and from the East Boston Harborwalk.

First Day

The celebrations don’t stop on New Year’s Eve. On January 1st, Boston hosts First Day events, too. Spend the first day of 2019 at Copley Square, partaking in different activities for family and children. The event runs from 12: 00 pm – 4: 00 pm and is free and open to the public.

Happy New Year to all our host families and international visitors! We hope your 2018 was filled with new and exciting experiences. Share your favorite memories from the past year with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Boston Holiday Markets

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Christmas is right around the corner, only 5 days away! Have you started your holiday shopping yet? Whether you’re buying presents for others or just want to look around, you can’t go wrong with one of Boston’s seasonal markets. Check out this list below to see where you should shop this weekend! 


Harvard Square Holiday Market 

The Harvard Square Holiday Fair returns Cambridge for its 33rd season. This holiday market features a variety of handmade items from local New England artists. As you browse the market, stopping at different stores and speaking to the craftspeople, you’ll find a selection of unique gifts, from jewelry to ceramics, to paintings to candles -perfect for friends, family, or yourself! This year’s Holiday Fair will be held at St. Paul’s Church Hall at 29 Mt. Auburn St. The market is open weekdays from 11:30 am- 7: 00 pm, Saturday from 10: 00 am – 7: 00 pm, and Sunday from noon – 6: 00 pm. Admission is free!


Downtown Boston Holiday Market

Have you walked through Downtown Crossing lately? If so, then maybe you’ve seen the Downtown Holiday Arts Market at its new pop-up location at 467 Washington Street. While doing some holiday shopping Downtown, make sure you stop by the Holiday Market where area vendors will be showcasing their work. Like the Harvard Square Holiday Fair, this winter market has an array of different handmade items, such as woodcarvings, metal sculptures, food, clothing and much more. You can find a list of participating vendors here – I’m sure you’ll recognize a few names! The Holiday Arts Market will be open until January 6th (with the exception of Christmas Day and January 1-2) The market is open weekdays from 11:00 am – 7: 00 pm and weekends from 11: 00 am – 5: 00 pm. 



Boston’s Cultural Survival Bazaar is an annual event at the Prudential Center that brings together indigenous artists from a range of different cultures. This special market is the perfect place to find a gift for globally-minded friends and family while supporting indigenous cultures. In the past, the Bazaar has brought artists from the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Venezuela, Colombia, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Tibet, India, Nepal, China, and many more. Make a quick trip around the world by browsing handcrafted pottery, blown glass, natural-dyed textiles, baskets, jewelry, and paintings. The Bazaar is open December 21st- 23rd from 10:00 am – 10:00 pm and until 8:00 pm on Sunday

Happy Holiday shopping! Share your unique holiday finds with us by Happy Holidays! If you see any of these festive plays, be sure to share your experience with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

See Holiday Theater This Week

Global Immersions Recruiting - Friday, December 14, 2018

Boston Ballet’s performance of the world-famous ballet, The Nutcracker, is perhaps the most well-known holiday show in the city. The Nutcracker, set to score of Tchaikovsky, tells the story of a young girl named Clara, who is taken on a magical journey when her nutcracker, a gift from her uncle, comes to life on Christmas. For many families, seeing the Nutcracker has become a holiday tradition. But, did you know that there are many other entertaining holiday musicals and plays annually performed in Boston? Local theater companies across the city host a variety of theatric holiday performances, based off of seasonal favorites like It’s a Wonderful Life or A Christmas Carol, all at a fraction of the price of a Nutcracker ticket. Below is a selection of some holiday shows to get you in the Christmas spirit!


A Celtic Sojourn

Boston’a Cutler Majestic Theater will host Celtic Sojourn, an annual show featuring holiday music, with Celtic and Pagan influences. Celtic Sojourn, once a popular radio program, has been transformed into a live performance every Christmas season for the past 15 years. The show features a cast of talented musicians, singers, and dancers from Celtic countries around the world. Performances will run from December 14 -23, 218. You can find more information and a showtime schedule here.  


It’s A Wonderful Life

If you’re a fan of the classic Christmas movie, A Wonderful Life, then you can’t miss out on seeing a live version performed by the Greater Boston Stage Company in Stoneham, MA. The Greater Boston Theater Company is a non-profit theater organization that performs six or seven shows a year. This holiday, the Company will also be performing another well-known holiday film, Tiny Tim’s Christmas Story from now until December 23rd. You can purchase tickets here, and a special discount is given to students!


A Christmas Carol

The Central Square Theater will also be hosting its own version of A Christmas Carol through December 30th. The performance tells the story of Charles Dickens’ famous novel and has become a holiday classic in Boston. Actors dance, sing, and use puppets to animate the story of Ebenezer Scrooge in Victorian-era London. The Theater also offers discounted tickets for both high school and college students. You can purchase tickets and find showtimes here.  


Hip Hop Nutcracker

Hip Hop Nutcracker is an unconventional rendition of the classic ballet, set in 1980s Brooklyn. This contemporary dance performance, hosted by the Emmerson Colonial Theater, features hip-hop mashups of Tchaikovsky’s famous music with a professional cast of dancers, an electric violinist and a DJ. Last December’s performances were all sold out shows, and this year is expected to be just as popular. Tickets still remain for this weekend’s shows, you can browse showtimes here.


Happy Holidays! If you see any of these festive plays, be sure to share your experience with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Get into the Holiday Spirit in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Although we just wrapped up Thanksgiving, radio stations are already playing Christmas carols, stores are advertising holiday sales, and families are buying their Christmas trees. Boston has begun to transition into the holiday season, as many areas of the city are displaying holiday lights and hosting winter activities. If you’re excited to celebrate the holidays in Boston, check out one of these festive events this week:

Mayor’s 2018 Enchanted Trolley Tour

Mayor Marty Walsh’s Enchanted Trolley Tour is back again for the 23rd year to kick off the start of the holiday season. The Trolley Tour consists of a series of events, such as tree lightings, holiday performances, and visits with Santa for young children in Boston’s neighborhoods. Some events, such as the lighting of the Christopher Columbus Park Trellis and the Copley Square Tree took place in mid-November, while others, such as the Boston Common Tree and Commonwealth Avenue Mall lighting, are scheduled to take place this Thursday and Friday, respectively. On Saturday, December 1st, the Mayor and a crew of holiday performers, will parade through the streets of Boston’s neighborhoods bringing music, dancing, and activities for kids. Find out when the Mayor will be in your neighborhood here.


Sowa Winter Festival

Boston’s popular farmer’s market returns to its South End location this winter for two weekends only, to host a special holiday-themed bazaar. Many of the local vendors from Sowa’s summer and fall market will once again open their booths for visitors to find a variety of merchandise, such as apparel, art, jewelry, crafts, food, and drink. The Winter Festival will also feature a separate area with food trucks, face painting, live ice sculpting and more. This event is the perfect place to buy holiday gifts, or just enjoy the afternoon browsing the different shops, listening to live music, and trying some delicious treats! Find a full list of vendors here.


Holiday Music on the Row

What better way to get into the holiday spirit than with a little music? Every Saturday Boston Free Radio will be sponsoring a musical event at Assembly Row in Somerville. Different local DJ’s will be at the Row each weekend to make your visit a bit more festive.   This month, the shopping center will also host a few winter events, like an Ice Sculpture Stroll and Santa Paws Pet Photos which are both free and open to the public!


Holiday Pet Photos

Speaking of holiday-themed pet photos, the Thorndike Dog Park in Arlington will also be hosting its own Santa Paws event. On Saturday, December 1st, dogs can get a free picture taken with Santa along with some tasty dog treats. Maybe you bring your host family’s pet? or just go to see some dogs and sip some (free) hot chocolate. The event will be from 10:00 am – 12:00 pm!

Spend Thanksgiving in Plymouth

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Plymouth, Massachusetts, a coastal town south of Boston, is an ideal location for a festive Thanksgiving outing. If you’re familiar with the early history of America you may know that Plymouth, MA was the location of Plimoth Colony, the site of the first Thanksgiving between Pilgrims and the Native Americans that inhabited the land. Plymouth is an exciting location to learn about the history of Thanksgiving, listen to stories about life in Plimoth Colony, and experience the culture and traditions of the Wampanoag tribe. Here are some can’t miss attractions for your trip to Plymouth this Thanksgiving break:


Plymouth Plantation

Immerse yourself in 1620s Massachusetts, at a site strategically chosen and developed to mirror the Pilgrims original settlement. At Plimoth Plantation you’ll experience what life was like for the Pilgrims during their first years in Plimoth Colony. The Plantation is an authentic re-creation of the Pilgrims’ homes, including those of well-known colony leaders such as the Reverend Brewster, Miles Standish, and Governor Bradford. Costumed historians portray actual members of Plimoth Colony and share their stories with guests. Visitors can also make their way to the Wampanoag settlement, for a more holistic picture of Massachusetts’s famous history. Here, Native American interpreters teach guests about their ancestor’s traditions and culture. This area contains the region’s only three-fire wetu, a family house often referred to as a wigwam. Plimoth Plantation is open daily 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. 

 

Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock is another historical artifact on display in Plymouth. The rock sits close by to a full-scale replica of the Mayflower, which is typically parked on Plymouth’s waterfront but has currently been moved to get repairs done. Plymouth Rock is the site where the Pilgrims disembarked from the Mayflower and first stepped onto land in Plymouth. Some stories say that each Pilgrim stepped on Plymouth Rock as they left the Mayflower. Today, visitors to Pilgrim Memorial State Park can view Plymouth rock where interpreters teach its history from May until Thanksgiving.

Pilgrim Hall Museum

Pilgrim Hall Museum is the oldest continuously operating museum in the United States. At Pilgrim Hall museum visitors get a detailed look at the history of the Pilgrims and their settlement. The museum has artifacts gathered from Plimoth Colony, such as furniture, crafts, art, and other possessions. Like Plymouth Plantation, Plymouth Hall Museum also shows the history of the Wampanoag people, who lived in the area of Plimoth colony well before the Pilgrims arrived. Pilgrim Hall Museum is open daily from 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. 


Jabez Howland House & Sparrow House

The Jabez Howland and Sparrow houses are two homes dating back to the time of the Pilgrims settlement. The Jabez Howland is the only existing house in Plymouth actually inhabited by Pilgrims. Jabez Howland and his family were Pilgrims that lived in the home until they sold the home in 1680. The home was then a private residence until 1912 when it was converted into a museum. The Richard Sparrow House was built by its namesake, Richard Sparrow, in 1640. Sparrow was an English surveyor that came to Plymouth in 1636, more than a decade after the Pilgrims arrived on the Mayflower. The home is the oldest surviving house in Plymouth. Visitors can tour the home daily between 10:00 am and 5:00 pm.


Explore Downtown

Once you’ve had your fill of history and museum tours, exploring downtown Plymouth is always a fun activity. Plymouth’s quaint waterfront streets are lined with restaurants, candy stores, and souvenir shops. Try some classic New England fudge at Plimoth Candy Company or find a present to bring home at one of the many boutiques. 

Global Immersions wishes all of our hosts and visitors a happy Thanksgiving! Whether this is your first, second, or third Thanksgiving in Boston, be sure to share all your holiday celebrations with us by using #HomestayBoston or tagging @globalimmersions!

Source: Planetware.com 

Veteran's Day in Boston

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, November 08, 2018

Sunday is Veterans Day, the federal holiday that honors and celebrates those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Veterans Day falls on the same day as Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, which are observed in other countries to commemorate the anniversary of the end of World War I. Veterans Day always falls on November 11th, as World War I ended at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. The holiday became official in 1954 after Armistice Day in the U.S. was renamed to Veterans  Day. Boston has a lot of events happening this week in honor of Veterans Day. Here are a few of the highlights: 


Veterans Day Parades                               

Boston has two annual Veteran’s Day Parades. The Boston Veteran’s Day Parade and the Veteran’s Peace Parade. The “original” Veterans Day celebration, the Veteran’s Day Parade, takes place on November 11th at the corner of Boylston and Tremont streets. The parade route continues on to City Hall Plaza and Faneuil Hall next to the statue of Sam Adams. The Parade features a variety of different participants, from ROTC groups to Veteran’s organizations, honorary militias, and marching bands. The Peace Parade follows a similar route, beginning shortly after the first parade. The Peace Parade also features a similar group of marching bands and veteran’s groups, however, it focuses more on the original intention of Armistice Day, as a celebration of Peace. Spectators can expect to see signs and banners promoting peace and non-violent solutions to wars or conflict. The Peace Parade was founded in 1985 by Veterans for Peace, an organization dedicated to increasing awareness about the harsh realities of war. At the conclusion of each parade, parade-goers are welcome to gather by the statute of Sam Adams to listen to speeches, anti-war reading, poetry, and music.


Veteran’s Day Harbor Cruise

The Harbor Cruise is a popular Veteran's Day tradition for both military and non-military families. On Saturday, November 10th, families are invited to tour Fort Warren on Georges Island to learn of Boston’s centuries-long military history, from the American Revolution through the Civil War and up to present day, while honoring past and present soldiers. The cruise departs from the Charlestown Navy Yard and from Long Wharf at 11:00 am and return at 3:00 pm.  Tickets are $10 for non-military members and free for active duty military members and up to three of their family members. To make sure you (and your host family) get a spot on the cruise, register here. 


Charity Walks & Runs

Two charity race take place this Veteran’s Day Weekend- the Dav 5K and Somerville Honor Run. The Dav 5K is a walk, run, or motorcycle race that honors those who have served and raises awareness of the issues and illnesses that military veterans may face. The event takes place on Boston’s Castle Island at 9:00 am on November 10th. The proceeds from the Dav 5K are used to support local organizations for veteran’s and their families. The second race, the Somerville Honor Runbenefits Somerville's George Dilboy VFW Post #529 and honors all those men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces. The event starts at 9:00 am on November 11th in Davis Square and consists of a 4-mile route. All participants get a long sleeve running shirt and entry to the post-race block party, where local restaurants and breweries will be providing refreshments. You can get your ticket to the race here.

We hope you enjoy your long weekend, and to the veterans in our host network – we thank you for your service! 


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