English Chinese Spanish Japanese Korean Turkish

News and Announcements

Welcome to Boston Homestay - Ritsumeikan University!09-Feb-2020

Global Immersions Homestay welcomed a group of college students from Ritsumeikan University (http://..

Welcome to Boston Homestay - SHOWA February Group02-Feb-2020

Global Immersions welcomed a group of female Japanese visitors from SHOWA Boston (https://showabosto..


Best in Hospitality

The Coolest Hot Chocolate In The City

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, November 29, 2016

It might not (technically) be winter, but I think you'll agree that it sure does feel like it. It hasn't snowed (yet), but I've already started bundling up on my way to work. One good thing about cold weather is that its a great time to drink hot chocolate! Here are some of the best places around Boston where you can find a gourmet cup of hot cocoa...because sometimes Swiss Miss just isn't enough. 

L.A. Burdick

The "drinking chocolate" at L.A. Burdick takes hot chocolate to a whole new level. This beverage - or should I say dessert- is as thick and creamy as its name suggests. While it does come in small servings, it is definitely not lacking in flavor. The drinking chocolate is made with a high-quality chocolate with an even higher percentage of cocoa butter. If you fall in love with this cup of melted chocolate-y goodness you can buy your own bag of the mixture to prepare at home - and therefore avoid making the trek to Clarendon or Brattle Streets in the freezing Boston winter. 

Flour Bakery 

Flour Bakery's Fiery Hot Chocolate gives a new meaning to the "hot" in "hot chocolate".  This spicy twist on classic hot cocoa, made with chocolate ganache, steamed milk, chili powder and cayenne pepper, is guarantee to warm your whole body up. 

Paris Creperie 


There's no such thing a too much Nutella, right?! If you're a fan of this hazelnut spread then the Nutella Hot Chocolate at Paris Creperie should be at the top of your must drink list. This drink is a mixture of warm milk and hot melted Nutella, instead of chocolate. I could put Nutella on everything so you can bet that I'm really excited about this. Bon Appetit! 

Cafe Vittoria 


If you would prefer Italian over French, the North End's Cafe Vittoria has a delicious mug of hot cocoa for you. The cafe's "Cioccolatto Caldois" is so rich you might have to eat it with a spoon. What makes this mixture so thick? The secret ingredient is corn starch. 

Sofra Bakery and Cafe 


Maybe Middle Eastern food is more your taste? Sofra Cafe and Bakery serves a Turkish -inspired cocoa, quite unlike your typical hot chocolate. This chocolate mix is combined with sesame caramel to give the whole thing a Middle Eastern vibe.

Thanksgiving 2016

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, November 10, 2016
Thanksgiving is right around the corner and I'm sure many of you have already started planning for your holiday celebration. For many of our hosts, this year's Thanksgiving day meal will be shared with their international visitor! Thanksgiving is a holiday that is unique to the U.S. which also makes it a very interesting celebration for international visitors. As a host, you should do your best to expose your visitor to this cultural holiday, as it is a very special experience. Thanksgiving is not a religion based holiday and therefore each family has different ways of celebrating the day and enjoying different foods.





If you traditionally have a large Thanksgiving celebration, make your visitor feel included by introducing them to your friends and family members. It is also helpful to explain the holiday and your family traditions beforehand. This allows the visitor to have a better understanding of why Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, what the holiday means and what to expect of the day. It can be overwhelming for a visitor with lower English skills to be in a situation with a lot of people and rituals but not know what to do or what is happening.  You can also encourage them to make and/or purchase a dish or food item from their own culture to share with you and your family.

With Thanksgiving, comes Thanksgiving break and many students will have a brief vacation from school. This holiday weekend is a good time for hosts to spend time with their students and participate in fun Thanksgiving - related activities together. If you're not sure what to do with your student during Thanksgiving and their days off from school, here are some ideas!


Enjoy a Thanksgiving Meal
Thanksgiving would of course not be complete without the Thanksgiving feast! As I've said before, every family celebrates the holiday differently and serves different foods. However, no matter what you serve, your visitor will feel grateful to be included in your celebration and sharing a Thanksgiving meal together will be a memorable experience for both you and your visitor. If you feel comfortable, let your visitor help you prepare for the day! Bake a dessert together or show them how you cook the entree. The best part about making a lot of food for Thanksgiving is that you get to enjoy the leftovers the next day :) 

Go Black Friday Shopping!
Another Thanksgiving tradition I take part in every year is Black Friday. Maybe I'm crazy, but I actually look forward to getting up at 5:00am to join the frenzy of shoppers at South Shore Plaza. This website shows Black Friday deals for all your favorite stores. Black Friday can be a fun and new experience, but if  the idea of getting up when it's still dark out doesn't appeal to you there are other shopping opportunities this Thanksgiving weekend. A festive idea is to visit a holiday market, like the Local First Holiday Market in Somerville or the Christmas in New England store at Faneuil Hall.



Watch the Macy's Day Parade!
Watching the Macy's Day Parade on TV in an enjoyable activity for you and your visitor to share. I know in my own home, watching the parade has become a Thanksgiving Day Tradition. It could be really interesting for your visitor, too because perhaps they have never seen anything like it. The parade airs Thanksgiving Day at 9am on NBC! 

Visit Plimoth Plantation
Nothing is more Thanksgiving related than a trip to Plimoth Plantation. Visit the historical sight this Thanksgiving weekend and experience the holiday in the place where it began! An enjoyable (and educational) trip.



Watch a Football Game!
Many high schools in the Boston area have big football games on Thanksgiving. I know in my own home town it is a tradition for all the alumni to come back and watch the game on Thanksgiving Day. Bring your visitor to a game and cheer on your town together! Maybe you even have a football player or cheerleader in your family that you can support. Another option is to watch a professional football game on TV.  Here is a schedule of all the NFL games that will be airing this Turkey Day! 

Look at Holiday Lights! 
It might seem early, but I can assure you that Christmas lights will already be up in many neighborhoods right after Thanksgiving. Take your visitor on a tour of Christmas lights! Drive around different neighborhoods and admire the homes holiday decorations. You can also show your visitor an excellent (and free) display of holiday lights at Blink!, a light and sound show at Faneuil Hall. From November 20th through January 1st you can watch over 350,000 LED lights blink and dance to music from the Holiday Pops. The show runs daily beginning at 4:30 pm. 

Go Ice Skating! Right around Thanksgiving is when most of the city's outdoor skating rinks open for the winter season. Boston Common's outdoor skating rink, Frog Pond, is open to the public for skating and skate rentals beginning in mid -November. There are also many other indoor rinks in the city that offer public skating and skate rentals throughout the week, such as Steriti Memorial Rink in the North End and Simioni Memorial Rink in Cambridge. You can find a complete list of all the Boston area public skating rinks here 


Enjoy the holiday! 





Veteran's Day 2016

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, November 09, 2016
Veteran's Day (this Friday, November 11th) is a federal holiday to honor the brave men and women of the American armed forces who risk their lives to protect our freedom. Veteran's day celebrates all soldiers, of all branches of the military, during wartime or peace. The holiday's primary purpose, however is to thank living veterans for their courage and contribution to our national security. What began as Armistice day in 1919 (commemorating the end of  WWI) has grown into a holiday which honors military personnel of all wars and is celebrated throughout the United States with parades and public gatherings. Boston has its own special Veteran's Day celebrations...take a look at what's happening this weekend:

Veteran's Day Parade


Boston celebrates Veteran's day with not one, but two large parades in the city. The first Veteran's Day Parade begins at 1:00pm on November 11th at the corner of Boylston and Tremont Streets. The second Veteran's Day Parade (aka the Veteran's for Peace Parade) follows right behind it to pay tribute to Armistice Day, a day of peace. So where should you watch? Both parades march around Boston Common, along Boylston and Tremont Streets and on to City Hall Plaza and the front of Faneuil Hall, ending in front of the statue of Sam Adams where you can listen to various speeches, anti-war poetry readings, and music. The parades are composed of different veteran's organizations, high school ROTC groups, military units, honorary militias and marching bands.

Veteran's Day Sales


If you're a Veteran, many shops and restaurants will be offering sales and discounts to persons with a military I.D. If you are not a Veteran, a lot of sales occur Veteran's Day weekend that you can take part in too! Wrentham Village Outlets offers some of its biggest bargains on luxury brands as many items are discounted on top of their usual discounted price. The store is easily accessible too, with the Wrentham Village Bus shuttling to and from the city. Assembly Row (Orange Line : Assembly station) has Veteran's Day sales too! Typically 30% to 70% off of already discounted prices. A great way to get your holiday shopping done early without having to deal with Black Friday madness!

Ravioli??


Fun Fact: Ravioli is known as the traditional Veteran's Day food since President Woodrow Wilson invited 2,000 returning soliders to the White House for a ravioli dinner in 1918 (once upon a time canned ravioli was a trendy dish due to advances in commercial canning) Carry on this tradition by enjoying some ravioli (though hopefully not from a can) in The North End!

Day of the Dead

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, November 02, 2016


Today is the last day of the traditional Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Meurtos. If you are not familiar with the traditions of this holiday here is a summary: Day of the Dead celebrations coincide with the Catholic holiday of All Saints Day (and also Halloween) and therefore indigenous people have combined this with their own ancient beliefs to honor their loved ones during the celebration. Those who celebrate Day of the Dead believe that the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31st and the spirits of all diseased children, or angelitos, are allowed to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On the holiday's final day (November 2nd) the spirits of the adults come down to join the family.  


Many indigenous families spend over two month's income on building beautiful ofrendas for the spirits. These altars are decorated with candles, buckets of flowers, mounds of fruits, plates of turkey, tortillas, and pan demuerto (special day of the dead bread). The altars must have a lot of food, bottles of soda, hot cocoa and water to replenish the spirits. Toys and candies are left for the young angels and on the 2nd, when the adult spirits arrive, shots of mezcal and cigarettes are offered along with tiny folk art skeletons and sugar skulls to add a finishing touch. In return for their offerings, people believe that satisfied spirits will provide protection, good luck, and wisdom to their families. On November 2nd, festivities are held at the cemetery. People clean tombs, play cards, listen to music, and reminisce about their loved ones. 



Skeletons and sugar skulls are important aspects of the Day of the Dead tradition. You may have seen trick - or - treaters dressed up as Day of the Dead skeletons this Halloween (girls with skeleton inspired face paint, flowers in their hair, ect.) The skeletons symbolize life after death (which is pretty much the whole theme of the holiday) During the celebration sugar skulls are given as gifts to both the dead and the living. Sugar skulls became a part of the tradition when sugar art was brought to the New World by Italian missionaries in the 17th century and was used to create lamb sculptures to decorate altars in the Catholic Church. Mexico, an area abundant in sugar production and too poor to buy imported European church decorations, learned from the Catholic friars how to make sugar art for their religious festivals. Sugar skulls represent a departed soul, with the name of the deceased written on the forehead and placed on the ofrenda or gravestone. The art reflects the folk  art style of big, happy, smiles, colorful icing and sparkling, glittering adornments. The creations of these skulls is very labor intensive and made in small batches in the homes of sugar skull makers. However, this art form is sadly disappearing as fabricated and imported candy skulls replace them. 



Day of the Dead is a very important holiday in Mexican culture, especially for those in indigenous, rural villages, as it keeps the community close and bonds families together. Day of the Dead is gaining popularity in the US, perhaps because American culture does not have a holiday to celebrate our dead, or perhaps because of the holiday's intriguing mysticism.


The Cost of Halloween

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, October 31, 2016

How much do Americans spend on Halloween each year? The exact numbers may surprise you. If you are celebrating Halloween in the Boston area, it's safe to assume that you have made a Halloween related purchase within the past few weeks, whether it be candy, a costume, or festive decorations. The stats for this year's Halloween spending are in and one thing is for sure.. Americans love Halloween.



Candy

Approximately 600 million pounds of candy are sold in the U.S. each year for Halloween, with 90 million pounds of that being chocolate sold during the week immediately preceding Halloween. In total, Americans spend $1.9 billion on Halloween candy each year. Which candy is the most popular?  A recent survey for Halloween 2016 shows that Reese's and candy corn are the most popular candies in the United States, and Starburst is the most popular in Massachusetts.



Costumes and Decorations

Survey shows that more than 157 Americans planned to celebrate Halloween, with 8 in 10 millennials saying they were planning something fun with their friends. Total Halloween spending topped $6.9 billion with the average American celebrating planning to spend about $74 on decorations, candy, costumes, and more. Which costumes were the most popular this year? According to Google, superheroes / super villain costumes beat out  princesses for the number one spot. This year Harley Quinn and Joker costumes were the most popular, likely due to their new movie out last summer. This year there was also a rise in pet costumes. 2016 saw a higher popularity in people dressing their pets in costumes than ever before. The most popular pet costume? A pumpkin.



Sources: Consumer Reports



Your Hallo-weekend Schedule

Global Immersions Recruiting - Thursday, October 27, 2016

Its almost Halloween! We hope your weekend is filled with crazy costumes and as much candy as you can eat. Monday is Halloween, so this weekend is all about being festive and getting in the Halloween spirit! There are a lot of exciting (and free!) events happening in Boston to ensure that you have a happy Halloween! Here are a few events to help you start planning your weekend of Halloween fun.             


Saturday: Halloween Pet Parade


Who doesn't love dogs in costume?? The Annual Halloween Pet Parade at Faneuil Hall Marketplace is the perfect Halloween event if you're someone that loves animals and would enjoy seeing them dressed up as characters.  If you have a pet at home (with a costume) you can enter them in the parade and costume contest! If you don't have a pet (or if they refuse to wear clothes) come to Faneuil Hall anyways to watch hundreds of Boston animals and their owners show off their Halloween best. Afterwards you can walk around Faneuil hall or the Harbor Walk (maybe grab some lunch, a Pumpkin Spice Latte, or more Halloween candy?) and see Christopher Columbus Park in its peak of fall foliage. 

Halloween Festival


The annual Halloween festival at Blackstone and Franklin park is back again with a full day lineup of fun events! Stop by from noon until three to enjoy activities like pumpkin decorating, face painting, costume contests (for humans and doggies) ice cream trucks, yoga class, scary stories, a haunted burial ground tour, live music, and craft making. This festival is a kid friendly event and is totally FREE - also easily accessible by the T :)! You can even be extra festive and arrive in costume.




October 30th is the final SoWa open market of the year, and end of the season will be marked by Boston's largest Halloween party! The day will feature your typical SoWa open market, with over 150 vendors, artisans, farmers, and food trucks, and additionally have festive Halloween activities for all ages. The special event will feature things like pumpkin painting, a live street musician, face painting, live music, and a costume contest (once again - for you and your pet!) The BPD will also be there letting you see the back of their cruisers (without having to be arrested!) Winter is coming...and if you haven't been to the SoWa open market this year, Sunday is your LAST chance until the spring. 

Enjoy the holiday! Don't forget to send us pictures of you and your visitors celebrating Halloween! You can also tag us in your Instagram posts with #homestay boston or @globalimmersions !  

Halloween Around The World

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, October 19, 2016


Do you know where Halloween originated? If you guessed the United States.. you're wrong! Halloween actually began in Ireland  about 2,000 years ago as the Spirits of Meath Halloween Festival, an ancient Celtic Festival held in County Meath. The birthplace of Halloween, naturally, is home to one the biggest celebrations of the holiday.  Throughout Ireland, Halloween is celebrated with bonfires, party games, traditional food  such as barmbrack - an Irish fruit cake that contains coins, button, rings, and other (non-edible) fortunetelling items- and, of course, beer (among other drinks of choice). Why bake buttons and rings into a cake? Fortunetelling is part of the old Irish Halloween tradition and if a young woman gets a ring that has been baked in a pastry, bread, or even mashed potatoes, then she'll be married by next Halloween. Tricks are also an important part of the Irish Halloween tradition  - kids knock on doors, then run away before the doors get opened by the owner  (usually after they've already gotten candy from other houses). Thus is the origins of Trick-or-Treating.

Curious about Halloween celebrations in other cultures? Take a look at some other countries that will be decked out in costume this October 31st. 

Mexico doesn't actually celebrate Halloween, but their Dia de los Muertos celebration begins on October 31st and continues through November 2nd.  During this festival, Mexicans remember the deceased, tell their stories and celebrate their lives. Celebrations include family feasts, skull-shaped sweets, tequila, dancing, mariachi music, and parades of people dressed as skeletons to honor past ancestors.


Halloween in Japan has become more popular over time, although still remains different from Halloween in the  United States. Due to the well established popularity of Cosplay (costume play: dressing up as manga / anime characters) in Japan, the costume and commercialism aspect of celebrating Halloween is appealing to Japanese people.  However, the Trick - or - Treating aspect of Halloween is not so appealing and will most likely not gain popularity in the country. Why? Because of their culture. It is important in Japanese society to avoid being a bother or pain to someone else. Having to go around collecting candy from others is viewed as too much of an inconvenience and is therefore discouraged. Halloween is mainly centered around dressing up and partying, which can be seen by the large masses of costumed people flooding the streets of Tokyo and the city's Shibuya district.
 

In France, Halloween is known as an American Holiday and is not celebrated for any other reason than to dress up and party. Halloween has been adopted by the French in recent years and is popular due to the French's love for fêtes and costumes. Notable Halloween celebrations in France occur in the town of Limoges, where there is a Parade of Ghosts and Ghouls every year, and at the Breakfast In American Diner in Paris. The French typically wear traditionally scary costumes - like witches, mummies or ghosts- rather than cute costumes - like superheroes, princesses, or celebrities. 


Germany celebrates Halloween as All Saints Day, from Octobrt 30th to November 8th. All Saints Day is spent attending church, honoring the saints who have died for the Catholic faith and visiting and remembering dead family members. It is also the tradition for Germans to hide their knives on All Saints Day, so the returning spirits won't be harmed by random knife movements during the day. Germans have also adopted American style traditions of Halloween and many people wear costumes and partake in celebrations at night. Trick- or - Treating is not very popular and it is only in the metropolitan cities of Germany that you will see groups of children actually go door - to door saying either Süßes oder Saures or Süßes, sonst gibt's Saure (Trick or Treat!) as they collect treats from their neighbors. This is partly due to the fact that just eleven days later it is the tradition of children to go door - to door on Saint Martinstag with their lanterns. They sing a song and then they are rewarded with baked goods and treats. 

Sources: The Travel Channel, GaijinPot, The German Way


Your Columbus Day Weekend Schedule

Global Immersions Recruiting - Tuesday, October 04, 2016

Happy (almost) Columbus Day weekend! As many of you have the day off from work, this long weekend will be an excellent opportunity to explore the city and participate in the many celebrations happening in Boston. Columbus Day weekend is a lively time in Boston, full of parades, festivals, and other events - and may of them are free! If you're unsure of how you'll spend this (somewhat controversial) holiday, don't worry, here is a list of all the happenings this weekend so you can celebrate the discovery of America right! 

Friday October 7th (through Sunday October 9th): HONK! Street Music Festival 

Where: Davis Square, Somerville 

Time: Varying times 

Cost: FREE


Music appreciation meets activism at the HONK! festival in Davis square. This lively three day event draws brass bands from all over the world to Somerville in celebration of not only music, but the community as a whole. This is event is special because it is organized entirely by volunteers and is already in its tenth year. The festival begins Friday and kicks off with a lantern parade through Davis square neighborhoods followed by a band showcase. On Saturday over twenty five bands will take over Davis Square bringing live music and a dance party! On Sunday, many local community groups join the band members in a large parade from Davis Square to Harvard Square via Mass Ave. These local groups include activists working for extremely important causes such as economic justice, protecting the environment, world peace and ending racism. HONK! Also features a Day of Action, on which bands convene to play on behalf of a cause. For more information including schedule and times click here. 


Sunday, October 9th: East Boston Columbus Day Parade 

Where: East Boston

Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Cost: FREE

The Boston Columbus Day Parade is an old tradition in the North End and East Boston neighborhoods. How old?? Since 1937. The parade celebrates Christopher Columbus's expeditions to the Americas as well as Boston's Italian heritage (in case you didn't know Columbus was from Italy) and the commitment if Massachusetts military units to American freedom. In even numbered years (aka 2016) the parade begins in the Suffolk Downs parking lot in East Boston, marches down Bennington Street and ends at Maverick square near the waterfront. Where to watch? The best viewing spots are along Bennington Street (Blue Line / Maverick). Get there early to claim a good spot! 


Monday, October 10th (aka Columbus Day) : Columbus Park Fall Festival 

Time: 12:00pm - 4:00pm 

Location: Christopher Columbus Park, Boston's North End (100 Atlantic Avenue - next to the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel) 

Public Transportation: Blue Line / Aquarium T stop 

Cost: FREE


I can't think of a more appropriate place to celebrate Columbus Day than at a park named after the explorer himself. This festival, which is sponsored by many local North End and Waterfront businesses, has become an annual event for the city and Columbus Day tradition for many families in the Boston area. The festival begins with a children's parade through the park, followed by a ceremony at the Christopher Columbus statue. There will also be a lot FREE entertainment and games (i.e. magicians, storytellers, musicians) My lunchtime suggestion: Bring a blanket and grab food from one of the nearby North End Italian bakeries or pizza joints, one of the many food stalls at Faneuil Hall Marketplace, or The Boston Public Market.

Opening our Doors Day

Time: 10:00am - 4:00pm 

Where: Multiple locations around the Fenway neighborhood 

Cost: FREE

More information:  Find a complete events schedule for Boston's Fenway neighborhood here 


The Fenway Alliance is inviting Boston residents to participate in the city's biggest single day of free arts, cultural, and educational events. The special festival will feature over sixty different activities, performances, tours, music shows, and games (did I mention for free??) Festivities will begin on the Mass Ave side of the Christian Science Plaza at the intersection of Huntington and Mass Ave with a kids parade (featuring a brass band), many performances, and...FREE CUPCAKES!! Also, as an added plus the event includes free admission into several Fenway museums (think: Museum of Fine Arts, Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum and the Mary Baker Eddy Library Mapparium)


Find more fun things to do this weekend in Boston here and on our facebok page

How Do You Like Them Apples!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Wednesday, September 07, 2016

The Autumn season is a great time in Boston to be out doors and admire one of the most beautiful seasons in Massachusetts. A fun activity this time of year is visiting farms around Boston for apple picking, pumpkin picking, hay rides, corn mazes and more...because (although it is delicious) pumpkin spice iced coffee isn't the only way to experience Fall. So put on your best flannel and enjoy the finest foliage (and cider donuts)  that New England has to offer. 

Boston Hill Farm, North Andover MA


Boston Hill Farm is a PYO orchard and farm stand located thirty minutes from the city in the quaint suburb of North Andover. The farm is open for berry picking in the summer and pumpkin and apple picking in the fall. Beginning in mid September through October the Farm hosts Apple Festivals every Saturday and Sunday and offers pumpkin picking until Halloween.  After you've decided on the perfect future Jack o' Lantern you can visit the farm stand for homemade treats like honey, jelly, fudge, and ice cream. 

Connors Farm, Danvers MA


When I looked at the map of Connors Farm is reminded me of an amusement park. There aren't roller coasters or anything like that but it definitely has more entertainment attractions that your average little red barn. In addition to apple picking and a fresh farm stand, Connors Farm is famous for their Giant Corn Maze which opens this year on September 10th - and this year its Charlie Brown themed. During October they open the Hysteria Scream Park (think: Giant Corn Maze but scary) in celebration of Halloween. Like I said before, there's no roller coasters, but there is rides! Hay rides that is....you can take one around the whole farm!

Russell Orchards, Ipswich MA


Russell Orchards might be well known for their apple picking, but the best part about the farm (in my opinion) is definitely their cider donuts. They are well worth the drive from Boston and are freshly made at the store everyday. Actually, one of the things that makes the Orchard's store so special is that everything is made fresh and all of the produce they see is grown right there on the farm. Right now, the store also features produce, honey, and eggs. My other favorite part about Russell Orchards is the animals :) You can visit all of the barnyard animals and even feed them too. If you don't visit for the cider donuts at least come for the bunnies. 

Labor Day Weekend!

Global Immersions Recruiting - Monday, August 29, 2016

Next Monday, September 5th, is Labor Day in the U.S. You may only know Labor Day as that Monday in September where you don't have to work, or if you're a student, it's that day in the beginning of the school year when you don't have class. But what does Labor Day really mean? Why do we have this holiday?



Labor Day is a public holiday that honors the American Labor movement and celebrates the contributions that workers have made to better the country. Labor Day has its origins in the labor union movement, specifically the eight-hour day movement, which advocated eight hours for work, eight hours for recreation, and eight hours for rest.

For many countries, Labor Day is synonymous with, International Workers' Day, which occurs on May 1st (you might also know this as May Day). For other countries, Labor Day is celebrated on a different date, often one with special significance for the labor movement in that country. (hint: ask you visitor about Labor Day celebrations in their country)


Labor Day in Canada and the United States is also considered the unofficial end of Summer (*sad face* ) as it is celebrated on the first Monday of September during the time summer vacations are ending and students are returning to school. 

What can you do to celebrate Labor day? When the it was first created, The form for the celebration of Labor Day was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday: "A street parade to exhibit to the public the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations, followed by a festival for the workers and their families". Since then, A festival or parade has remained the basis for a proper Labor Day celebration, though with some changes made over time. Now, we see Labor Day filled with fire work displays, last trips to the beach, outdoor BBQs, and, of course, $ales. If you're looking for ways to spend you Labor Day this year, consider taking part in these events around Boston: 


Labor Day Fireworks over Boston Harbor-

Fire works launched from barges anchored off the North End and Seaport will illuminate the sky over Boston Harbor in celebration of Labor Day and the beginning of fall. The show begins at 9pm on Saturday, September 3rd. 

Where to watch: The best place to see the display is from the lawn along Christopher Columbus Park or by Long Wharf in the North End. The fireworks can also be easily seen from the South Boston Waterfront (especially around Fan Pier/ Seaport), the downtown waterfront, and Piers Park in East Boston


Labor Day Sales- 

Do some back to school shopping or revamp your fall wardrobe with Labor Day Sales throughout the city. The best places to shop? You can take advantage of reductions on already discounted prices at places like Assembly Row or Wrentham Village. If you're looking to stay in the city to shop, check out sales at Faneuil Hall, the Prudential Center, or shops around Downtown Crossing. 

For more Labor Day activity ideas click here. Enjoy the long weekend with your visitors!! 

 



Recent Posts


Tags


Archive